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aquaholic99

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  1. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from Grover65k in Inspiration or madness - a fine line. Amazing tank.   
    I discovered early on that is important not to worry about that line between inspiration or madness. I've also found it useful not to mind what others may think.
    And for those that might worry, take comfort in knowing there is always someone more extreme than you.
     
  2. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from crusty76 in Giant Pink Gourami - The "Jolly Swagman" and Co.   
    The volume filter looks interesting but might work for 'heavier than water solids' but might not catch suspended solids. I only skimmed the technical specs though.
    I can't remember if I posted earlier about wedge wire? or this DIY version?
     

    the extensive parts list is a 35 liter bin and a stainless steel mesh to stop oil splatter when you cook.
    I got the bin on sale for $10 and the mesh was about $6 from a kitchenware place. Self closing flap has been removed. The springs look useful and I can use the flap itself elsewhere. I will also need some trickle filter media and a powerhead/waterpump.
    The mesh is a nice fit with a convenient handle. Its labelled as stainless steel so I hope it doesn't rust.

    The photo below shows the main concept. It will be easy to drill some holes to accept 2 PVC pipe fittings. One hole at the bottom to return water back to tanks and another hole at the top to remove waste to drain/garden.
    I will secure the lid into position/angle with a single stainless steel screw or wing nut as I do need to access the inside occasionally.
    I will use bio balls as trickle media but keep them in several nylon mesh bags for easy removal and cleaning. I may use the unwanted flap to help spread water but bio-balls are designed to self improve trickle flow.
    The dirty water from fish tanks (incoming water) slides down the stainless steel mesh so the dirt washes down to the bottom side of the mesh which has a small 5mm lip to a drain hole. Almost all the water will continue down into the bucket to get biologically filtered. I will add an air stone at the bottom of the bucket so there is a counter current of fresh air going up through the bucket against the water for optimum bio filtration. Removing a lot of the dirt already means the bio-filter does not have to work as hard too.

  3. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from BristlenoseGirl in Giant Pink Gourami - The "Jolly Swagman" and Co.   
    The volume filter looks interesting but might work for 'heavier than water solids' but might not catch suspended solids. I only skimmed the technical specs though.
    I can't remember if I posted earlier about wedge wire? or this DIY version?
     

    the extensive parts list is a 35 liter bin and a stainless steel mesh to stop oil splatter when you cook.
    I got the bin on sale for $10 and the mesh was about $6 from a kitchenware place. Self closing flap has been removed. The springs look useful and I can use the flap itself elsewhere. I will also need some trickle filter media and a powerhead/waterpump.
    The mesh is a nice fit with a convenient handle. Its labelled as stainless steel so I hope it doesn't rust.

    The photo below shows the main concept. It will be easy to drill some holes to accept 2 PVC pipe fittings. One hole at the bottom to return water back to tanks and another hole at the top to remove waste to drain/garden.
    I will secure the lid into position/angle with a single stainless steel screw or wing nut as I do need to access the inside occasionally.
    I will use bio balls as trickle media but keep them in several nylon mesh bags for easy removal and cleaning. I may use the unwanted flap to help spread water but bio-balls are designed to self improve trickle flow.
    The dirty water from fish tanks (incoming water) slides down the stainless steel mesh so the dirt washes down to the bottom side of the mesh which has a small 5mm lip to a drain hole. Almost all the water will continue down into the bucket to get biologically filtered. I will add an air stone at the bottom of the bucket so there is a counter current of fresh air going up through the bucket against the water for optimum bio filtration. Removing a lot of the dirt already means the bio-filter does not have to work as hard too.

  4. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from Slipshodman in Does everyone use air pumps   
    @Bitis - you can increase efficiency of your water bridge with gradual curves or wider diameter. It's also much cheaper to bend your own pipe than use elbows. Longer legs on your bridges allows you to water change without having to re-prime them.
    I started with air lift and gradually moved onto powerheads, expanding into multiple tiers. Eventually automated water change.

    These are old photos of drained tanks. Here I am using a single Aquaclear 802 powerhead to filter almost 50 tanks. All the work is done in raising the water to the top tier so to maximise this energy usage I use gravity to trickle filter the water on the way down too. The flow does not have to be fast. The tanks are linked by water bridges and I have home made overflows. The last tank on the bottom also has a drain hole to waste (vegie patch) so I can drip in new water in constantly 24/7 instead of doing manual water changes. New water displaces old water so its very simple
     
     


  5. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from Grover65k in Giant Pink Gourami - The "Jolly Swagman" and Co.   
    The bog filter would work adequately without the rise and fall since its so big. Add some water crest or iris to remove nitrates. It will also mechanically filter efficiently. 
    So that removes  the need for affanan siphon & cetus sieve whilst reducing water change/consumption. 
    I think i saw floatrons on the clearance table at Masters Hardware. 
     
     
     
  6. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from crusty76 in DIY Clay Cave - Aquarium safe clay?   
    If you want DIY caves to breed then the 50 cent terracotta saucers (for under the pots) are what I use. Use pliers to nibble part of the lip out and flip it upside down. Make the hole only slighly bigger than the male so he finds it easy to defend. The bigger space lets him incubate several egg clutches at once. And very easy to see what stage eggs are on glass bare bottom tanks.  Just peek from underneath. 
    Another penny pinching option is to use a house brick. Silicon a tile or glass or slate to one side and you have either 3 big holes or 10 small holes (depending on type of brick you use) for $1.50 .
    I prefer the terracotta saucers over log caves as they stack for storage and much easier to artificially hatch eggs with. Just tilt sideways with an airstone in an ice cream container. So babies can be poured out easily. 
     
     
  7. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from mbunamad in Teewah ck Rhads - first fry of the season   
    What does "liking" a post do? What is the reasoning and benefit? 
    All the notifications they create are equally annoying. 
  8. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from Slipshodman in Tank Builder Sydney, what to ask/know ???   
    Since you are unsure of what to ask/expect yourself, I would use a reputable LFS to help you. 
     
    And anything custom means more expense and less resale value if you decide to sell up later. 
  9. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from Matmatmat in No-one can stay away forever?   
    Yes... very hard to stay away from AoA & Donny. I went there three times yesterday. 
  10. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from Donny@ageofaquariums in No-one can stay away forever?   
    Yes... very hard to stay away from AoA & Donny. I went there three times yesterday. 
  11. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from Slipshodman in Snails for a cold water environment   
    A lot of people mention apple snails but they really mean mystery snails. Minor point but apple snails are a real menace /pest and the ornamental aquarium industry have a bad enough rap as it is.
    If you PM me your address, I'll post some snails to you. 
  12. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from Heintz.G in Snails for a cold water environment   
    A lot of people mention apple snails but they really mean mystery snails. Minor point but apple snails are a real menace /pest and the ornamental aquarium industry have a bad enough rap as it is.
    If you PM me your address, I'll post some snails to you. 
  13. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from Sclero p in fish V's Frogs V's Mozzies V's Snakes   
    I think Koi will eat bear dung?
  14. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from Donny@ageofaquariums in the things i do...   
    Pull out sumps are good where space is very tight but a pull out mesh bag of media can't be topped for simplicity and ease of cleaning.
    Instead of wheels you can use roll bars or slide bars ( especially if space is needed).
  15. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from ageofaquariums in Horror problems from fluke treatments?   
    Always risky giving out medication advice, especially online where you can't judge the skill level of the fish keeper.
    I like trichlorfon and formalin and copper when it comes to flukes. They do build resistance so a variety of treatments including a heavy short term salt bath (sometimes till you see slime coat burn) is a good thing.
    Book knowledge is good but the best way to get valuable experience is to kill a lot of fish unfortunately. Hopefully save more than you kill.
  16. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from jc12 in Giant Pink Gourami - The "Jolly Swagman" and Co.   
    If you are setting and walking away for the day, use two timers in series. I do this for those electrical timers (pumping water somewhere) as well as the garden hose timers.
    If you are as pessimestic about equipment failure as I am, use different branded timers as well. 
  17. Like
    aquaholic99 got a reaction from the cichlid kid in Gumtree Fail   
    Cotton earbud plastic stems also work well. 
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