Jump to content

MFF

Forum Member
  • Content Count

    126
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    5

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    MFF reacted to Foskett96 in WTB Parachromis Multifasciatus (formally P. Friedrichsthalii)   
    No need to apologies at all, I appreciate a detailed response
    I am not giving up. I am currently going to grow the group out and see how they turn out. Due to import laws Australia seems to constantly be in positions of losing pure strains from the hobby. Take the speices in the Vieja (or paraneetroplus idk they change them all the time) so many of them have been cross breed as people don't know what they have or they are intentionally attempting to spawn hybrids.
    I have some pretty exciting growouts happening for me at the moment with my wild caught Hypselecara Temporalis pair, wild caught wavrini (although from what I have read getting a female is near impossible),  the Parachromis Multifasciatus and now also a group of 6 Parachromis Dovii which were a birthday present from a close friend. I have read that it will take them quite a while to out grow a 6x2x2 so by the time they have I plan to have a larger tank or I know people with larger tanks to move them on too. P. Dovii has been a bucket list fish for me as long as I can remember.
    My last group of P. Multifasciatus turned xanthic at around 12cm which was quite early on. I guess in hindsight I guess that saved me from growing them for many years for it to happen then. I have always tried to find info on what could trigger then to turn later on or earlier in life, but I think no one knows. Here is a video of them in the growout tank. They are in there with some Melanotaenia Duboulayi as dithers. It is fascinating to see the dominate in the group when they are displaying dominance and flash the tradition adult colouration.  I did need to remove the driftwood and divide the tank in half as while the 6 P. Dovii are still small they will growout in here as well. I didn't want to risk just chucking them in there with the P. Multifasciatus and coming home to a massacre ahaha. I am not the greatest photographer so I think that coupled with the setting on the radion light has washed out some of the fish and made them look white. 
     
  2. Like
    MFF reacted to Grover65k in Giant Pink Gourami – Billabong Ontknoping   
    Hi @MFF
    I need someone with your experience :-)    Are you on 'AirTasker' ???
  3. Like
    MFF reacted to Markfnq42 in Display tank   
    my old big tankhttps://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ye6u_ERj06A&t=10s
  4. Sad
    MFF reacted to gingerbeer in Age of Aquariums   
    For those who have not noticed Age of Aquariums has closed there doors.  It was somewhat quietly done without a big fanfare.  
    What is the future for the hobby like?  We are losing a lot of good stores and lots of good breeders.  
  5. Like
    MFF got a reaction from Nishi in Ph levels   
    My mixed malawi/tanganyika tank is at 8.3 and it has BN catfish and also Syn Petricola.  Peppermints might be OK also, but I prefer the common BN (definitely not longfin, not albino) for the African tank.  They're a bit hardier.   The peppermints would look very similar to commons once they get older anyway.  I do have peppermints in with the discus.
  6. Haha
    MFF reacted to BarrelTankz in New Member with New Idea!   
    Hi Guys,
    I am new to the hobby and the site. I started to get interested in aquariums recently and being somewhat 'handy', I decided to have a crack at a unique aquarium build.
    I ended up building an aquarium from a full size wine barrel and putting a perspex porthole in the front for viewing.
    I'd love to get some feedback from you guys on your thoughts and potential issues going forward just please keep in mind that I am a builder/cabinet maker/creator and not a seasoned aquarium enthusiast. I just had an idea and wanted to get into the hobby.
    I wouldn't mind making a few of these for people either, if there was some interest.
     
    Thanks in advance.
    (First and last images are of the tank empty)
    Aaron
  7. Like
    MFF reacted to QldMick in natives   
    1 year on.
    <
     



  8. Like
    MFF reacted to pebatom in What fish can I have with angelfish?   
    I think this chart is crap. According to this you can keep angels with barbs ( they will actually eat the angel's fins) but shouldn't keep them with south american cichlids. You can keep angels with quite a lot of south american cichlids. This chart is not even close to reality. I suggest you look for fish you like and then do a more detailed research to see if they are compatible. I keep angels along with geophagus, sterbai corys and whiptail cats. No problems here at all.
  9. Like
    MFF got a reaction from Zuthdahr in General hardness   
    Have you tested the water you use for water changes?  I imagine it would test as very low hardness, but worth checking all the same.
    If indeed the rainwater you use for water changes is very low in hardness, then the minerals must be added to the water after it gets in the tank.  Various things like holey rock, certain sands, clay etc can all leach minerals into water.  Of course if you have lots of stuff in the tank, it can be hard to pin down exactly what is causing it.
    You can test the hardness immediately before, and immediately after a water change, you should see a change.  Then over time (hours, days) the levels may creep up again.
    So you not only want to remove the minerals from the water, but also remove the source of the minerals from the tank.
  10. Like
    MFF got a reaction from JB in What fish can I have with angelfish?   
    True, angels are pigs.  Tip to get the discus to eat - scatter the food widely across the aquarium, don't just dump it all in one spot.
    Having said that, when I stick a couple of dried blackworm cubes on the glass, it's the discus that sit there eating them.
     
  11. Like
    MFF reacted to QldMick in Electric Yellow offspring types   
    you could check out this thread. 
    I got some of dougs that he breed and selected for years crossed with some new blood. their were some plain fish but I was allowed to select those I wanted. I ended up with some great fish, some light lemon yellow and some more bright sunshine yellow. 
    I think overall their genetics can vary a bit, but unless you have a white or blue morph you should select towards the bright yellow/black fins type.
  12. Like
    MFF got a reaction from Slipshodman in Water Quality   
    Yes, .25ppm for Ammonia is too high.  This should essentially be zero on any liquid test kit.  The nitrates are also very high, but I'd be more concerned about the ammonia.  What you need to do to fix the ammonia will automatically fix the nitrate anyway.
    Fish can get used to non-ideal conditions, but I would NOT be happy with your numbers.
    Definitely do a 50% water change ASAP, and then probably another 50% within a day or two.  Also measure the ammonia and nitrate in your tap water, these should come out "low".  If ammonia or nitrate are "very high" in your tap water, then you may have other issues.  If Ammonia in the aquarium is not (close to) zero, there is a problem with your cycle.  I would not add any chemicals - in my experience this just gets you more problems down the road. 
    After two 50% water changes, measure the levels again.  Nitrate should be down to around 25ppm (if your reading of 100pm is accurate and your tap water has typical levels of nitrate - i.e. very low), which is acceptable (my tanks run up to 40ppm approx before I do water changes).   The important one is ammonia, which should be down to around 0.10 ppm.  This won't come down to the same degree as nitrate, because there is a non-zero level of ammonia in the tap water, especially after adding the dechlorinator which frees up ammonia from the chloramine.
    In the short term, 0.10 for ammonia is tolerable, but you really want to get your bacterial filtration working properly again which should reduce this number.  So monitor the ammonia level (in particular) and if it rises, your cycle is not ready, so you may need more water changes to avoid putting your fish in danger.
    Once the tank is stable, both ammonia and nitrite should be essentially zero on any liquid test, and they should stay on zero, thanks to the bacteriological action.  The nitrate will slowly build up over time, and when it gets high (my definition:  40ppm or thereabouts) then a partial water change is the only way to export the nitrate.
     
    For reference, my tap water measures about 0.09 to 0.10 ppm in ammonia (using a Seneye meter) once I add the dechlorinator and let it sit for a while.  My tanks though have ammonia at 0.02 or lower.   (The Seneye meter is much more accurate than the liquid tests, unfortunately it only does ammonia and pH).  The tanks are lower than tap water because the bacterial filtration brings it down.
     
  13. Like
    MFF got a reaction from Cam07 in Water Quality   
    Yes, .25ppm for Ammonia is too high.  This should essentially be zero on any liquid test kit.  The nitrates are also very high, but I'd be more concerned about the ammonia.  What you need to do to fix the ammonia will automatically fix the nitrate anyway.
    Fish can get used to non-ideal conditions, but I would NOT be happy with your numbers.
    Definitely do a 50% water change ASAP, and then probably another 50% within a day or two.  Also measure the ammonia and nitrate in your tap water, these should come out "low".  If ammonia or nitrate are "very high" in your tap water, then you may have other issues.  If Ammonia in the aquarium is not (close to) zero, there is a problem with your cycle.  I would not add any chemicals - in my experience this just gets you more problems down the road. 
    After two 50% water changes, measure the levels again.  Nitrate should be down to around 25ppm (if your reading of 100pm is accurate and your tap water has typical levels of nitrate - i.e. very low), which is acceptable (my tanks run up to 40ppm approx before I do water changes).   The important one is ammonia, which should be down to around 0.10 ppm.  This won't come down to the same degree as nitrate, because there is a non-zero level of ammonia in the tap water, especially after adding the dechlorinator which frees up ammonia from the chloramine.
    In the short term, 0.10 for ammonia is tolerable, but you really want to get your bacterial filtration working properly again which should reduce this number.  So monitor the ammonia level (in particular) and if it rises, your cycle is not ready, so you may need more water changes to avoid putting your fish in danger.
    Once the tank is stable, both ammonia and nitrite should be essentially zero on any liquid test, and they should stay on zero, thanks to the bacteriological action.  The nitrate will slowly build up over time, and when it gets high (my definition:  40ppm or thereabouts) then a partial water change is the only way to export the nitrate.
     
    For reference, my tap water measures about 0.09 to 0.10 ppm in ammonia (using a Seneye meter) once I add the dechlorinator and let it sit for a while.  My tanks though have ammonia at 0.02 or lower.   (The Seneye meter is much more accurate than the liquid tests, unfortunately it only does ammonia and pH).  The tanks are lower than tap water because the bacterial filtration brings it down.
     
  14. Thanks
    MFF got a reaction from johnbetta in Water Canges   
    There is an API Nitrate test kit (and a Nitrite one also, but you want the Nitrate).  Costs about $20, roughly.  Any decent LFS should have it.
    The Master Test Kit includes a bunch of other stuff that is also useful (pH, ammonia etc) if you don't already have them.
    Vacuuming gravel - I do this every time I change water - about 3-6 weeks depending on which tank you're talking about.  Don't deep clean all the gravel - just part of if, and the entire surface.
  15. Thanks
    MFF got a reaction from johnbetta in PH issues - Feeling lost and unable to fix my tap water.   
    Yup, those fish are all fine, even the neons.
    I wouldn't do anything, really.  Just stop adding chemicals, let the water be.  You've recently done a water change, so leave it alone until the next change.  Then, using 50/50 rainwater is a good idea as johnbetta said, that will help to lower pH and also to dilute any chemicals.
    If you don't have any driftwood yet, I'd add some for stability (and aesthetics if you choose carefully).
    Other than that, just let it settle.
  16. Like
    MFF got a reaction from Anna's Aquarium in PH issues - Feeling lost and unable to fix my tap water.   
    Hi Anna.
    Welcome, and hopefully you can get some help.  Be aware you will likely hear different suggestions as well.
    First off, don't go chasing numbers.  If you get your fish used to tap water - whatever the parameters are - then they will be fine.  Saves you work trying to adjust it all the time also.  Fish can deal with parameters outside their supposed "ideal" conditions, but they prefer stability over quick, large changes.  Let the water be what it is. 
    You didn't mention your water source, but if it is Brisbane tap water, that should be fine for most fish.  I've found Brisbane water - where I am - to have a relatively stable pH around 7.8, so definitely on the high side of neutral.
    Second - try to avoid adding stuff to the tank, unless absolutely necessary.  Buffers can just make your life difficult in the long run.  Yes pH changes during the day, as long as your fish are coping, I wouldn't worry too much.  If you think the pH is a little high, you're better off doing some natural modification like putting in a few chunks of driftwood (after curing, if you wish) which will tend to bring the pH down a little and also will help to stabilise the tank.  
    Having said this, there are certain additives that are essential - dechlorinator to new water being the main one.
    You didn't mention the types of fish you keep, just "tropicals".  Most of these are tank-bred rather than wild caught, and are quite tolerant of a range of conditions.
    Good luck.
    Michael
     
  17. Thanks
    MFF got a reaction from wadedidit in South American setup - Angelfish companions   
    No, I think two species is good.  I'll end up with rummynose and black neons.
    With serpae though - they can be a bit nippy towards other fish.  With a large school, might be OK, but definitely something to watch.  You don't want them going after the apisto fins.
  18. Thanks
    MFF got a reaction from johnbetta in South American setup - Angelfish companions   
    No, I think two species is good.  I'll end up with rummynose and black neons.
    With serpae though - they can be a bit nippy towards other fish.  With a large school, might be OK, but definitely something to watch.  You don't want them going after the apisto fins.
  19. Thanks
    MFF got a reaction from wadedidit in South American setup - Angelfish companions   
    My tank is the same size, I have 10 discus, 6 angels, 4 peppermint bristlenose, 2 bettas (1M1F - there were more F but he didn't approve of them), and about 60 tetras.  Tank does not look full at all, but as the discus and angels mature, I think this is probably sufficient.  Might get 1 apistogramma pair, and might get a few more tetras.
    Definitely agree with gingerbeer that a large group of tetras of the same species looks much better than a few of everything.  I've got 4 species, because I collected them from my other tanks, but longer term, as the flames and pristellas die off, I will be replacing with more of the 2 main species - rummynose and black neons.  Say 40 rummynose and 30 black neons will look cool.
  20. Thanks
    MFF got a reaction from johnbetta in Angels and Discus   
    You'll find people on both sides of this argument.  I have 10 discus and 6 angels in a 600 L tank at the moment, both angels and discus have spawned.  Not expecting any fry to survive of course.
    It can be done - but it's not a sure thing.  If you're basically transitioning from discus to angels (and presumably other things later), I'd say give a go.   The discus may last a surprisingly long time, so careful about adding too much all at once.
  21. Like
    MFF got a reaction from Scott87 in Ideas on fish that aren’t yellow/orange   
    Tiger barbs have a reputation for being nippy.  Would not normally expect this to work with angels, discus, guppies, gouramis or possibly rainbowfish.
    Perhaps you have a well behaved bunch.
  22. Like
    MFF got a reaction from raycam01_au in Tang substrate   
    Aragonite
     
×
×
  • Create New...