Jump to content
Tristan

Interesting read- Tank Cycling

Recommended Posts

My tank finished cycling a few days ago following this method. Took 28 days.

But, the tank was orginally set up with coral sand /rock for Tanganyikan cichlids.

When I couldn't easily obtain the fish I wanted, I decided to strip the tank and set it up for Apistogramma.

Kept the Matrix in a heated tub using the tank water while I cleaned out the tank.

Then over the course of the cycling I did some 30-50% water changes to slowly bring the pH down to whatever tap water is.

I've just added some ammonia to keep everything running until some plants arrive mid-week.

Will then re-test and if needed, will do a water change before adding fish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Where did you buy ammonia from? Realised its next to impossible to find any! Without having soap etc added anyways

I got it from here 200ml Ammonia FOR Fishless Cycling Free Gift 4 Leaf Clover | eBay

I started the cycle with "cloudy ammonia' that contained no detergents Shake the bottle and no suds are formed) as I didn't want to wait a week for the eBay purchase to arrive.

I decided to switch to pure ammonia for the top-up feeds. By the time I add fish I would have done 2 or 3 very large water changes.

If you search on the net you will find articles for & against "cloudy ammonia". The problem is that the product can be different depending on which company makes it. So, it may contain detergents or other additives that can be harmful to your bacteria and possibly to the fish you add.

I don't think it's really worth the risk but as I say; on the net you will find strong views for and against using "cloudy ammonia".

If you use aged media as Aquaholic99 suggest, you could be good to go in a couple of weeks. It depends on how heavy you are going to stock your tank.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been using quickstart of late setup my new rack with brandnew media in the sump rack is 1500ltrs and used a bottle that treats 1797ltrs 2 days later threw about 10 fish in then another 3 days after that another 20 tyen around day 8 i loaded it right up no dramas at all, i have done this a few times now mainly because i am inpatient, but it's not cheap stuff was like $40 for that bottle but if your inpatient as me it works a treat lol!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are several types of cloudy ammonia. I don't remember if the woolworth's cloudy ammonia makes the water cloudy but I don't think so and if it did, it would be short. A normal tank cycle often causes some cloudiness from bacterial booms anyway.

Ammonia is easy to find from any chemical store if you have a company ABN. Nitrifying bacteria don't care were the ammonia comes from though and the internet will have successful startups from people using urea, plant fertiliser and urine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been using quickstart of late setup my new rack with brandnew media in the sump rack is 1500ltrs and used a bottle that treats 1797ltrs 2 days later threw about 10 fish in then another 3 days after that another 20 tyen around day 8 i loaded it right up no dramas at all, i have done this a few times now mainly because i am inpatient, but it's not cheap stuff was like $40 for that bottle but if your inpatient as me it works a treat lol!!

I did the same just used QuickStart for my 4ft and when I added more then 4/5 fish at once used it again

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yer i added a whole bottle of api quickstart to the aquarium... But havnt seen any nitrate being produced? So im worried once i add fish they wont be able to keep up with the ammonia...but im sceptical as always ;p

I have purchased a bottle of ammonia so we will see if when i add it the bacteria does its job properly and starts producing nitrate then i will feel comfortable adding fish :)

Spending 150 bucks on my peacock bass so dont want to come home to them floating :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yer i added a whole bottle of api quickstart to the aquarium... But havnt seen any nitrate being produced? So im worried once i add fish they wont be able to keep up with the ammonia...but im sceptical as always ;p

I have purchased a bottle of ammonia so we will see if when i add it the bacteria does its job properly and starts producing nitrate then i will feel comfortable adding fish :)

Spending 150 bucks on my peacock bass so dont want to come home to them floating :P

You won't see any nitrate's until you add fish and start feeding them, if you mean nitrite you should start seeing it soon as ammonia is converted to nitrite.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Something else that can increase the speed of a new tank cycle, is adding lava rock from a cycled tank.

But my favourite way by far is adding plants. The things are covered in good microbes.

Of course you then risk snails, but even snails will speed a cycle, and help prevent nutrients being locked up as algae.

The quickstart is pretty dam good at higher level doses.

I look forward to seeing how the starter culture tech evolves.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You won't see any nitrate's until you add fish and start feeding them, if you mean nitrite you should start seeing it soon as ammonia is converted to nitrite.

I think this statement is incorrect.

There are two groups of bacteria at work; the first group convert ammonia to nitrite and these reproduce fairly rapidly.

The second convert the nitrite to nitrate and these reproduce much slower.

You can speed things up a touch by high water temp (around 30C).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this statement is incorrect.

There are two groups of bacteria at work; the first group convert ammonia to nitrite and these reproduce fairly rapidly.

The second convert the nitrite to nitrate and these reproduce much slower.

You can speed things up a touch by high water temp (around 30C).

I could be wrong but i was always lead to believe this was the case and nitrates were caused from fish waste and over feeding, which then you statement makes sense also as fish waste produces amonia, which then leads me to wonder in another direction if amonia breaks down into nitrite and nitrate then why can bacteria only process nirtite and to lower your nitrates you need water changes when bacteria can process amonia, i could be reading it all wrong but then it sounds like bacteria never actually processes anything it just breaks it down into another chemical.

Which now would mean i've had it all wrong all this time but i've been doing a hell of a job at winging it lol!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I could be wrong but i was always lead to believe this was the case and nitrates were caused from fish waste and over feeding, which then you statement makes sense also as fish waste produces amonia, which then leads me to wonder in another direction if amonia breaks down into nitrite and nitrate then why can bacteria only process nirtite and to lower your nitrates you need water changes when bacteria can process amonia, i could be reading it all wrong but then it sounds like bacteria never actually processes anything it just breaks it down into another chemical.

Which now would mean i've had it all wrong all this time but i've been doing a hell of a job at winging it lol!!

Yep it just turns it into a less harmful elements

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Daymmmmn I've had it a little twisted all this time, I'm prty impressed I winged it quiet well haha!! To be honest I've never read anything on bacteria's just spoke with people... Learn something new every day. Also shows how impatient I am when it comes to cycling I just look for the quickest way to add fish no one wants to look at an empty fish tank haha!!

Edited by Obeice
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I enjoy reading the nitty gritty details of how these filtration systems work.

There are also bacteria that breakdown nitrate but these prefer low oxygen environments. (which is difficult to achieve in an aquarium)

Reading on the Seachem website I found this "Matrix™ provides both external and internal macroporous surface area. These macropores are ideally sized for the support of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria. This allows Matrix™, unlike other forms of biomedia, to remove nitrate along with ammonia and nitrite, simultaneously and in the same filter."

Which is interesting because my newly cycled tank (that uses Matrix) is today showing zero ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. This is after dosing 2mls pure ammonia 2 days ago, which gave a reading 30mins after dosing of 4ppm ammonia. One day after dosing, I had 40ppm nitrate.

Whilst it's planted, I don't think there are enough plants to get rid of that much nitrate in such a short time.

Fish farms take this science to a whole other level, calculating to the fish, how much bio-load their filters can handle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I enjoy reading the nitty gritty details of how these filtration systems work.

There are also bacteria that breakdown nitrate but these prefer low oxygen environments. (which is difficult to achieve in an aquarium)

Reading on the Seachem website I found this "Matrix™ provides both external and internal macroporous surface area. These macropores are ideally sized for the support of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria. This allows Matrix™, unlike other forms of biomedia, to remove nitrate along with ammonia and nitrite, simultaneously and in the same filter."

Which is interesting because my newly cycled tank (that uses Matrix) is today showing zero ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. This is after dosing 2mls pure ammonia 2 days ago, which gave a reading 30mins after dosing of 4ppm ammonia. One day after dosing, I had 40ppm nitrate.

Whilst it's planted, I don't think there are enough plants to get rid of that much nitrate in such a short time.

Fish farms take this science to a whole other level, calculating to the fish, how much bio-load their filters can handle.

You need to remove oxygen to make a de-nitrator. I made a simple one out of 300m of 4mm black micro-irrigation tube (black to prevent algae) and a very slow rate of water.

Algae scrubbers are another good way to remove nitrate. I have some of my systems connected to an outdoor tub/tank (3000L). It's also useful as a method to feed green water to the system for better fish colour. Actually I have 3 tubs/tanks as I rotate them with taps to grow the green water.

Some aquatic plants are very good at removing nitrogen. Elodea, duckweed and hornwort (foxtail) for example

Edited by aquaholic99
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Often the missing nitrates are bound up in algae.

I've got a tiny bit of algae growing on some wood.

This is the second time I have dosed heavily and nitrates have dropped quickly to zero.

Waiting on some plants tomorrow; the tank will then be quite heavily planted.

Also will try and source some Canadian peat moss to drop the pH. (fighting Adelaide water :( )

Link to comment
Share on other sites



×
×
  • Create New...