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Slightly dependent on the fish but can you see any ectoparasites (external)? if not than it is likely internal, check to see if you can see any inflamation of the gills or any differences ie not feeding, stringy poo or anything else abnormal. If it is an internal parasite i find the best treatment is metronidazole in either the food or in a bath depending on if its eating or not. This should sort it out. In saying that most fish have parasites and will live relatively unharmed for their whole life, its all part of a healthy ecosystem, its only when it becomes pathogenic in a confined space (a tank) that problems really arise.

Cheers, Shane

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You could try the below, AOA sell it.

STERAZIN - parasiticide.

STERAZIN is used or the control of gill and body parasites which cause fish to flick when no symptoms are visible to the unaided eye. STERAZIN will also aid the control of internal parasites such as Round Worm, Thread Worm, and Intestinal Worm. In order to destroy the parasites in all stages of their life cycle you will need to use the product on days 1, 3, 6, 8 and 10. STERAZIN may also be used to aid the sterilisation of aquatic plants and is highly biodegradable.

Do not use when crustaceans, echinoderms, rays, seawater sharks, pirahna, sturgeon or sterlets and related species are present. In these instances use Waterlife PARAGON.

Suitable for seawater, tropical freshwater and coldwater aquaria.

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Before treating with ANYTHING other than salt be sure of what you are actually treating. If it is white spot (or any parasite really) then no point using a hospital tank - you will need to treat your entire tank. Although many use Waterlife products I detest them, having found little success with them in wholesale, retail and personal use and many problems. If you have natives and they have gill flukes treatment is as follows - use Paraex / Paracide in accordance with directions on bottle. Add extra aeration. Add salt. (PM me for amount of salt). Again though be sure of what you are treating before you treat. If you are unsure there are several safe options you can use - pm me for info. Cheers

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Natural flashing can occur with a simple water change, nitrate levels being high and hardness level changes are the usual suspects, as Donny has hit on above.

If there has been a recent water change, or you have tampered with parameters, let things go overnight, unless it can be backed up with a physical symptom or appetite loss.

I actually don't mind the Waterlife products, if it is a parasite, you could use Protozin or Sterazin depending on what symptoms your fish have.

And I agree with [MENTION=8516]none[/MENTION] re hospital tanks, they may help stop the spread but you are going to need to treat the whole tank to make sure.

But don't treat unless you need to, most treatments are going to stress your fish, and you might find them gaining immunity to products that you will need in the future.

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Okay, yeah you don't want to be using Sterazin with a crustacean in your tank. But if there is a parasite infecting your fish, that doesn't exempt the crustacean from getting or carrying it, or the parasite remaining in the tank?

I would remove the yabbie to the hospital tank for a salt bath, while using the Sterazin treatment on your fish and the tank. Wait til the treatment is over, do a PWC and add some carbon to the tank to remove the meds before returning the yabbie to the main tank.

There is probably products that work on yabbies, but I have never required them. Someone will know more or have a better idea.

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I assume you mean you gave your tank a salt bath for hydra/flatworm? If so, and if you still have a parasite, then the tank and both occupants are possibly still infected.

You will probably need to get a med for the tank and occupants that is safe for crustaceans.

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The problem with Silver Perch / Bass and Yellowbelly is they come from aquaculture facilities and often come riddled with parasites. It really is disgusting. I know of aquarium shops and wholesalers that stopped selling them due to the flukes etc., that come in on them. They are kept in huge numbers in the aquaculture facilities in an environment that is ideal for flukes - massive stocking - massive food - massive waste. They are bred for stocking rather than fish tanks. This is no excuse - flukes shouldn't be added to waterways or dams - although they do occur naturally in the environment. Honestly if its fingerlings you want to keep you need to dose up the salt quite high when you get them and a dose of Paraex or Paracide (same thing - different brand) will be needed. Given how badly infested the fingerlings often are you will often need 2 -3 treatments. You must treat the entire tank. Flukes will be in any tank the fish have been in. This was the problem for retailers and wholesalers running systems - it goes through everything.

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Saratoga are far more touchy than the natives you have so I would recommend getting more experience first. Ring around the local shops - that's the best way to get ideas of current prices. Saratoga are seasonal.

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I'll sell the silver when it's treated, and do a blackwater setup with like sooty grunters, my eel tail catfish, and like bass

From The Native Dude

"Blackwater" normally refers to water with tannins - i.e; Amazon or Honey Blue Eye / Rhadincentrus habitats. Tannins are caused by (in the Australian case) Tea Trees and similar. PH very acidic and very soft water. This has nothing to do whatsoever with the natives you are talking about. A Sooty grunter when full grown will need a big tank (often to itself) likewise a Saratoga. None of these species are "blackwater" species.. Common Archerfish will die in soft acidic water - they require the exact opposite - hard, alkaline and salt. I'd recommend reading lots of books - doing research and learning as much as you can. That will greatly improve your chances of success in the future. Edited by none
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Yeah I was considering selling all the fish and putting the guppy things in our pond (keep my glorious yabbies) and do a blackwater setup with like a Saratoga, Archerfish, and my eel tail (keep him as well). Any ideas on how much money little small Saratoga fingerlings are?

From The Native Dude

not a good idea stocking your pond with mosquito fish considering we've already pointed out thats what they are from your photos and are a quite rightly a noxious fish.

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