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CelesteAmie

Noobie strikes again

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So I've just read an article about cycling your water for your fish :) I've been told some conflicting information that I just wanted to sort out.

I now know about ammonia, nitrite and nitrate and how the good bacteria's work. (By the way what are some recommended testing kits for these and where to buy?)

The fellow at the pet store said cycle the water without any plants or fish for a good three weeks before introducing any of these. But it seems strange as an article I just read kind of indicated that the cycling process does not begin until you have added the fish and plants as the ammonia released will rise once they are in there etc. I was thinking of getting maybe 6 tetra or other hardy fish to start this process. What are your thought?

Also the article did mention if you would like to speed up the cycling process you can ask your local fish store (particularly a good quality store) for a scoop of their gravel, of which this would already have some good bacteria attached? Thoughts again? Any other tips or tricks or experiences are also welcome. Thank you everyone!

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You have a very good Aquarium shop in Smith's Aquarium close to you at Boondall.

Just drop in and ask Mark or Andrew they will help you out with everything you need including test kits.

You can cycle your water by itself but it takes a lot longer than if you put if a starter culture.

This starter culture can be in the form of fish, gravel from another tank dirty water from a working filter or a bought culture such as "Cycle".

If you want to put fish in to help your cycle then be prepared for them to die as such get the cheapest you can.

Graeme

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So I've just read an article about cycling your water for your fish :) I've been told some conflicting information that I just wanted to sort out.

I now know about ammonia, nitrite and nitrate and how the good bacteria's work. (By the way what are some recommended testing kits for these and where to buy?)

The fellow at the pet store said cycle the water without any plants or fish for a good three weeks before introducing any of these. But it seems strange as an article I just read kind of indicated that the cycling process does not begin until you have added the fish and plants as the ammonia released will rise once they are in there etc. I was thinking of getting maybe 6 tetra or other hardy fish to start this process. What are your thought?

Also the article did mention if you would like to speed up the cycling process you can ask your local fish store (particularly a good quality store) for a scoop of their gravel, of which this would already have some good bacteria attached? Thoughts again? Any other tips or tricks or experiences are also welcome. Thank you everyone!

Commercially available bacteria dramatically speed up the process. Adding fish straight away may add add disease to the tank by way of the fish getting stressed out. Not what you want in a new tank. Buy a good live bacteria culture - some shops will sell refrigerated live strains which are ideal - add the bacteria - wait the time recommended on the product (less than 1 week) and go from there.

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Feeder goldfish are treated with no respect....... if you are going to get a disease it'll likely be from feeders.

I just add a pinch of fish food to get the cycle started. Adding live plants is a great alternative to bacteria in a bottle products as they come crawling with bacteria.

Theres the risk of snails usually, but that rarely puts me off. Speaking of which, gravel from a lfs is likely also live with malaysian trumpet snails.

Grabbing an API master freshwater kit, and writing down your test results each time........ will turn you into a pro in no time.

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Time is a funny thing.

With so many variables, and with so many loose definitions of what a cycle is......... there is no answer.

I like ROBUST cycles, where you raise very dense microbe populations before adding any fish.

How long? well when tests show ammonia and nitrite have peaked and then settled at 0ppm EVEN when I stress test the tank by adding more ammonia.

Freshwater tends to cycle fast, although slower at very low pH. Then marine, although we need to understand the difference in marine between cycled and matured. Brackish is usually where I find the cycle really draaaaaaaaaaaaaags on and on and on. But once there is very efficient.

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Time is a funny thing.

Brackish is usually where I find the cycle really draaaaaaaaaaaaaags on and on and on. But once there is very efficient.

Very, very true.. True brackish aquarium - not to be confused with the low salt concentration added to fresh water tanks - take AGES to cycle and canactually go through the nitrogen cycle several times before stabilising. Reason: the quantity and % mix of bacteria required to get it right.

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the safest option is to be patient with your aquarium cycling. take on the advice your being told and just wait.

im cycling a 6ft tank at the moment and im at least, anywhere from 3 to 4 weeks away from being comfortable about adding any new and expensive fish.

Yes, patience is a characterisic involved in our hobby that you must exercise from the very beggining and it applies to newbies and experienced keepers.

Grrrrrrrrrr, another 3 to 4 weeks for me, but well worth the wait.

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