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grubby

Pond filters DIY

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Can anyone point me in the right direction on this. I am going to set up three of those 240 litres plastic pots I bought at Masters as ponds, I have power heads on them to agitate the water, but I think I may have to set up some sort of filtration system. Anyone got any good Aquaponic or diy canister solutions that I can build ?

Thanks,

Phil

By the way, after having some Moggil creek Crimsons that I caught on Saturday kamikaze on me I decided to cover the whole pond. It was set up with a shade cloth over 50% of the tub in a tent like fashion, but using gutter guard (the cheap bunnings one) and cable ties I have managed to jump/bird proof the whole pond and installed a removable section for maintenance .

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So many possibilitys IF you already have your powerhead!

Get your hippy on and go check out the recycle bin!

Sure theres a container you can McGyver a bit and stuff with filter media.

Then just work out how to either suspend it over the pond, or even better how to hang it on the side like a HOB filter, usually easy enough done with some stiff fencing like wire.

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I am going to set up three of those 240 litres plastic pots I bought at Masters as ponds, I have power heads on them to agitate the water, but I think I may have to set up some sort of filtration system.

Just to give you an alternative view...

I have a few rectangular black 200 litre "Bunnings tubs" similar in size to your pots with native fish (rainbows, pygmy perch, honey blue eyes) against the wall of my shed so they get morning sun but are shaded in the afternoon. I have the tubs loaded with plants (mostly duckweed, hornwort and some java moss) without any powered circulation or filtration. I think there is a benefit to NOT mixing the water because it allows the bottom and middle to remain cooler on very hot days. This gives the fish a refuge. Sticking my arm in tells me the bottom stays a lot cooler. Similarly on cold nights (I'm in Melbourne) the middle/bottom stays that bit warmer. By not circulating the water the fish can choose where to hang out. Watching the water movement with a strong torch at night I can see there is some natural convection moving the water around and there is no evidence to suggest a lack of oxygen at the bottom. The tubs now have self sustaining zooplankton communities and at night by torchlight you can see that the very slight cloudiness in the water is living swimming microsocopic dots = fry food that I wouldn't really want to filter out.

Aquaponics is a legend idea for all kinds of reasons :applause: ...so definately go for that .. but perhaps you don't need power heads or filtration in all the pots? ... of course... my comment assumes low stocking densities. Bigger fish and high stocking then filter away!

Edited by Grubs
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I would use a "bucket filter". Just bury a small internal power filter under coarse gravel within a bucket or flower pot. The gravel becomes the mechanical and biological media. If you use a 10 L container, you have made a 10 L internal canister filter for under $8. You can plant up the gravel as well as use a fancy pot if you want to dress it up (more cost ).

Pull bucket out and rinse gravel clean only when flow starts to reduce. Probably every 2-3 months. I leave the handle on buckets for easy access. Use gravel size that is too large to get sucked into internal filter.

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You can do exactly the same thing with an air driven sponge filter. Just bury the sponge. Air uplift flow rate is plenty for a small pond. You can run airline long distances underground if you don't have power nearby.

I bred so many rosey barbs using these.

Almost zero mechanical filtration tho.

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