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SuperChlor & adding trace minerals to aged water

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Ok guys. Does anyone know if Superchlor will remove trace minerals from aged water?

What is the "life span" of Superchlor is a water barrel?

Supachlor contains EDTA which will chelate a lot of metals which in turn can then be used plants. As Aquaholic99 mentioned Graham is very knowledgeable on this.

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Ok guys. Does anyone know if Superchlor will remove trace minerals from aged water?

What is the "life span" of Superchlor is a water barrel?

Hello Peter,

Supa Chlor will remove toxic ions by chelation, in the case of iron for example, (usually found in Bore water) it will turn it into EDTA Chelated iron which is the only way plants can take up iron effectively.

it adds trace elements in the form of Carbon which is essential to all carbon based life forms.

Supa Chlor will treat chlorine and toxic ions in the water once you have added it, but if you add more water treat the volume you add.

Regards Graham

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Hello Peter,

Supa Chlor will remove toxic ions by chelation, in the case of iron for example, (usually found in Bore water) it will turn it into EDTA Chelated iron which is the only way plants can take up iron effectively.

it adds trace elements in the form of Carbon which is essential to all carbon based life forms.

Supa Chlor will treat chlorine and toxic ions in the water once you have added it, but if you add more water treat the volume you add.

Regards Graham

Thanks for the reply Graham. What I meant to ask is, if I add trace minerals such as Discus Trace to treated water, will Superchlor remove them? Is there a time period that Superchlor works in to remove or change minerals in the water, and after a set period it's effectiveness wares off, at which point it would safe to add such trace minerals.

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Hello Peter,

Supa Chlor will remove toxic ions by chelation, in the case of iron for example, (usually found in Bore water) it will turn it into EDTA Chelated iron which is the only way plants can take up iron effectively.

it adds trace elements in the form of Carbon which is essential to all carbon based life forms.

Supa Chlor will treat chlorine and toxic ions in the water once you have added it, but if you add more water treat the volume you add.

Regards Graham

Hi Graham, This is very interesting just one part are you saying if I do a water change and my tank that holds 500 litres and I take 200 litres out that I only treat the 200 litres I'm putting back in with Supa chlor and not the whole 500 litres

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Ok guys. Does anyone know if Superchlor will remove trace minerals from aged water?

What is the "life span" of Superchlor is a water barrel?

First of all, what is the pH?

That decides much of the answer.

6.5 seems to be the sweet spot, much higher and iron gets harder to keep up.

Theres an excellent table on the backyard aquaponics forum that shows this very well.

Worth checking out.

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P

Thanks for the reply Graham. What I meant to ask is, if I add trace minerals such as Discus Trace to treated water, will Superchlor remove them? Is there a time period that Superchlor works in to remove or change minerals in the water, and after a set period it's effectiveness wares off, at which point it would safe to add such trace minerals.

Hello Again,

Supa Chlor used to remove Calcium from town water by Chelation (not with EDTA), so it would have been a problem once for the Calcium part of your Trace elements, it now does this with a Carbon Aldahyde which sequests Calcium Carbonate back from Calcium Hydroxide leaving you with small amounts of Calcium Carbonate.

That having been said, don't worry about having to much Calcium Carbonate, Supa Chlor is more designed to break down Calcium Hydroxide not adding heaps of Calcium Carbonate which it doesn't do.

Keep using your trace elements as usual, don't forget Chelated iron, it helps catalyse all other trace elements for plants. This is a part of our Glutaraldahyde fertiliser. That's if its plant growth you want.

Edited by Graham CLJ
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Hi Graham, This is very interesting just one part are you saying if I do a water change and my tank that holds 500 litres and I take 200 litres out that I only treat the 200 litres I'm putting back in with Supa chlor and not the whole 500 litres

Hello

Just treat the amount of water you are adding back to the aquarium.

Regards Graham

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Hello

Just treat the amount of water you are adding back to the aquarium.

Regards Graham

Oops no worries [MENTION=3677]Graham CLJ[/MENTION] that might explain why I went through my last bottle so quickly oh well when [MENTION=1338]The Tech Den[/MENTION] sells it so cheap I can afford to throw it away well not really

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Oops no worries [MENTION=3677]Graham CLJ[/MENTION] that might explain why I went through my last bottle so quickly oh well when [MENTION=1338]The Tech Den[/MENTION] sells it so cheap I can afford to throw it away well not really

You're not the only one, I've always treated the total volume too :(

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Chelation being chemical binding (rendering it unavailable).

Sequester being the accumulation /buildup.

I'm not sure if sequests is the right word for what Hydrated lime (Calcium Hydroxide) does to Calcium Carbonate.

This process is known as Clarking because it was discovered my Mr Clark in the 1860's. It's where Lime softens water of Calcium Carbonate so you have a low Carbonate hardness but Lime then reads as an elevated General Hardness. If you pass Carbon Dioxide through an Aqueos solution of Hydrated Lime you end up with a precipitate of Calcium Carbonate. So when your reading Hardness in Town Water it's all wrong and it usually gets higher with higher levels of rain.

I hope everyone is now suitably confused. I still think about it everyday, water is difficult to Fathom.

Well every second day.

Graham

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I would use sequester as a biological accumulation. Example how ciguatera or mercury is only a problem when eating bigger predatory fish. Smaller fish aren't able to collect dangerous amounts individually.

Water is an amazing molecule. The physical characteristics are just as interesting as chemical.

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