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littlebitfishy

How To Lower The ph?????

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What is your current pH? What do you want it to be? And why?

If you want a lower pH because you want to keep soft water fish (who often live in more acidic water) the requirements are quite different compared to a situation where you have very alkaline water and want to bring the pH down a bit because you want a planted tank

Edited by regani

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If your just keeping fish, and they aren't wild caught or for breeding, I would generally say 7.5 will be fine, what species are we talking?

There are quite a few ways to lower ph, my suggestion whichever way you decide would be to do so slowly.

What works best and how much of a product you require is going to depend on the buffering capacity of your water.

You can try,

Tannins in driftwood

PH Down

Peat in a bag inside the tank

RO water

Special substrates

Indian almond leaves

Black water extract

They all work to varying degrees of maintenance.

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my suggestion whichever way you decide would be to do so slowly.

Yep excellent advice, Fish can suffer severely from pH shock. pH 7.5 to 6.5 is a big drop. If you have no fish in the tank, by all means use pH down and hit the magic number. Just remember when you add fish make sure the water they have been kept at is similar. If there are fish in there do it slowly - small amounts of pH down at a time. For reference - not all driftwood will lower pH..

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Keep in mind if you use a cheap pH down product you can wind up adding a chunk of phosphates to the tank - resulting in an algae bloom. Personally I think you can't beat a good substrate and some driftwood.

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I want to keep a variety of fish from cichlids to tetra and others ( I WANT to keep Rams!). So it's a freshwater/tropical tank. So a breeder advised me to go for a 6.5, and I agree. I'll try RO water.

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Phosphoric acid is the best/simplest way. Used to know a german guy who bred fantastic discus at Clayfield (before Brian took over), that's how I found out. Used it myself when I had discus too many years ago, & makes the PH very stable, doesn't take much.

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Before you play with chemistry....understand the fish you are keeping

reducing pH with acids doesn't reduce TDS

Most fresh water fish that like low pH water also like low TDS (soft water)

natural Acid water is soft

I suggest you lower TDS before attempting to lower pH....ie add rainwater or RO water

Don't focus on pH alone....you will end up in tears

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Yep excellent advice' date=' Fish can suffer severely from pH shock. pH 7.5 to 6.5 is a big drop. If you have no fish in the tank, by all means use pH down and hit the magic number. Just remember when you add fish make sure the water they have been kept at is similar. If there are fish in there do it slowly - small amounts of pH down at a time. For reference - not all driftwood will lower pH..[/quote']

I wanted to come back to this one although a little off topic.

First up I agree the ph drop is large and fish can suffer ph shock.

But on the other hand, I'll drop ph around 0.5 each night with co2 injection while others are doing a full point.

So what is ph shock? Is it dropping ph too rapidly or is ph shock a proxy for say going from a higher kh (and maybe TDS) to lower and this is the issue. Or a combination? Just been thinking about this every so often.

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Hi @Delapool I don't really have time at the moment for the long version of the answer but here's the short version - rapid pH changes can kill fish or cause serious health issues. Obviously there are huge variables - some species are more resilient than others. All pH changes should be made gradually to avoid issues. pH shock can occur both ways - high to low and low to high. The effects on fish can be profound. Cheers

PH Shock - The Free Freshwater and Saltwater Aquarium Encyclopedia Anyone Can Edit - The Aquarium Wiki

Edited by none

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If [MENTION=353]Rod[/MENTION], [MENTION=655]reg[/MENTION]ain, [MENTION=2388]Daydream[/MENTION] say anything about soft water fish I listen. I even listen to Pete, but only when he was [MENTION=514]briztoon[/MENTION].....

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Would it be fair to say then that lowering / increasing ph requires testing on other water parameters eg kh or TDS? Or is that test kit overkill?

If you are looking to change PH then knowing how much fight you have on your hands is a must, so KH kit is in.

In saying that, I don't really bother with PH too much, I just manufacture via RO the required TDS and let the PH be what the PH will be, so for me TDS is in.

But yeah, it all works hand in hand, just remember to change ph you need to overpower the buffer capacity or you get bounce back. If people try and attempt this in one dose without having a clue about their KH (or other buffering agents in their water) people will end up in tears.

Hence why it is best to do it really slowly and take as long as it takes. I would suggest reading/searching a bit about buffering and ph, it might give you more insight then my incoherent ramblings.

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