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liquidg

Hard corals or not to hard corals.

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The real achievement for reefers is supposedly sps varieties of corals, yeh right??!!

The real achievement I think is doing a saltwater tank with what you like, not what you want as an achievement or to compete with others, I mean you have to look at it and look after it, right?

With enough money sps are very easy so why bother, after looking at enough tanks, the right decision is easily made and a google search or two shows plenty of options.

Personally I would never go with just a fish only aquarium, which was the first aquarium I had, you see it gets old real fast with out some mobile and none mobile inverts and by none mobile I do not mean hard corals.

For low light or semi high nutrient tanks, there are morphs of all types and lps if you want a couple of hard corals, heaps of low calcium based algae life like corallines sold and flexible, the choices are almost endless!

I do have many hard corals and two large ones that have been around for a few years, but to me they are just left overs from when I found far more simpler and beautiful tank life to appreciate.

The old hard corals in the last pics, though quite pretty, to me are very ordinary compared to the morphs and simple high and low calcium content algae.

If I was to do it all again, to start a tank from scratch, I would have ulva due to it being a form protist community and very tough and great food for many, I mean there are the two best at a low tide at many common sites around bris, then capensis, its at any shallow sites where there are high nutrients and low light and hypnea and more.

All these import nutrients and provide homes for many small invertebrates that lots of fish enjoy hunting for and combined, provide far better colour than hard corals with near no work for the hobbyist.

With a good external bio filter, they allow you to have your tank jammed with fish with rarely a parasite showing up and do away with the need for skimmer and the worries that go with the hobby at times.

You feed your fish and watch them grow as their waste makes al the tanks colour grow and flourish, oh and you have to dose what corals need with these types of algae.

Simple inverts, these are so much cheaper and simpler to enjoy.

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Hard corals, big deal!!

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sps-1-_zpszlxysv3z.jpg

Edited by liquidg
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Hi, it is me noobs again, is the first pic Hypnea?

Thanks.

And what is the in 2nd pic?

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If I was to do it all again, to start a tank from scratch, I would have ulva due to it being a form protist community and very tough and great food for many, I mean there are the two best at a low tide at many common sites around bris, then capensis, its at any shallow sites where there are high nutrients and low light and hypnea and more.

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In the first pic is blue/purple hypnea and red/orange/gold capensis.

Second pic is green Rhodactis, blue/purple hypnea, maroon/dark orange capensis, pink coralline, biscuit sea star, a little blue Dictyota under the sea star, its eating it and a hammer coral.

There are roughly three variations of capensis around here, heaps near the sewe5age pipe at the sea way for one spot and all will morph with shape and colours, depending on light and nutrients.

They love the sewerage, any where there is reasonable salinity and high nutrients, they are in big numbers!

They are slow at growing and with out rough dosing, “just chuck some in”, the same as corals, for get it, they will pale and turn to mush!

There are no algae species that are not invasive, just some are so easy to control!

Oh and if you ever get any, check them and dip them, ‘they will grow back no worries” to make sure hair algae doesn’t come with them.

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The trendy dive spot at the sea way, the concrete platform they recently added easier access for divers, under that concrete platform is the sewerage pipe.

There were huge protests back when the line was put past sea world to empty out through the sea way.

Any way any of the large rocks in the area has capensis under and between them, not the sewerage pipe it self, just that area.

Free diving there for them is 4 to 8 feet deep.

The southern wall of the sea way you can take as many or as much of anything for your aquarium more or less, just not eating fish species, they have size to them and the north wall is in the moreton bay marine park.

Capensis is not a recognized algae species, virtually no one uses it and algae has to be taken by hand or hand held tools and you have to be aware that taking algae you have to be self regulating, that means take it at reasonable amounts, that's how the law is worded more or less, no matter, capensis is not regulated in any way.

Most folks did not know it exists!

Edited by liquidg
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