Jump to content
fishfriendzzz

Snail mass die offs

Recommended Posts

Hi.

I know i am somewhat defying the general trend favoring snailacide in asking this, but we all have our reasons. I'd like to ask for some opinions as to possible causes of mass snail die off. Looking at these snails, and many, many departed before them, my instinct has always being that their issues are pH related. My source water is not hugely stable and a pH of 8.0-8.2 is not uncommon. I am wondering however if there is more to this than just pH. I rarely medicate so don't see that as a definative cause. I have seen similar mass die offs from these guys, a common garden variety brown river snail, ramshell snails and apple/mystery snails. Ironicly, the one snail i wouldn't mind seeing a mass extinction of, malaysian trumpet snails, seem to be totally uneffected. Die offs aren't issolated to a particular tank or overall water conditions either, with random die offs occuring over numerous different tanks and ponds. Any thoughts?

Cheers.

post-12417-14711634205744_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most likely culprit is copper .

But have you treated for planaria or hydra lately ?

or used worming medications ?

quite a few medications can be detrimental to snails ( except MTS - which take fish killing levels of copper over several weeks to kill completely )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Air borne is an interesting thought Lictoga. I am well away from industrial areas so its not something i'd considered but may be worth more thought. As for something in the water... Yes, that is more my thinking too. Yep, your not wrong about MTS being able to shut up shop tight. Apple snails wouldn't be far behind though. The comparative difference is MTS have a much harder shell so that may contribute to their endurance.

Ahhh, now that is something i had overlooked pony-tail, copper! I'll have to dig up my copper test. I have a bit of a species mix so i specifically avoid anything copper based. Well, maybe. When medicating, one ingredient of what i sometimes use is malachite green. I have variously heard it'd argued that the green is from copper, but i've also heard it at least as vigorously argued against. Might need to look into that more. But no, i don't treat for hydra, planaria etc. I can't actually equate these snail die offs to any actual treatment, i treat that infrequently. More than that though, i've variously had the issue for over 3 years in different tanks and ponds with different parameters. A pH of 8.2, while not preferable, should at least be survivable by those snail types which makes me think there's more too it. Off to find my copper test, cheers for the thought! ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aaaaand the results are in.

I tested 2 spots. The first is a tank where those snails came from. It tested as 0mg/L. The second test was of my main pond. It's been established going on 4 years and was first where i saw similar snail shells. There haven't been recent snail issues, but that may be more due to lack of snails. Anyway, it tested (reading generously) as 0.05mg/L. I do say generously as the colour distinction was faint. So... Copper is possibly not the prime suspect maybe?

In the past i had variously considered a calcium deficiency. Since then, i've become aquainted with the gH test. My reading have always being at least 8-10. As gH tests could be scewed by magnesium, among other things, i even chanced a calcium test, all be it labelled as for marine. A month or some before those snails died off, calcium in that tank tested as 120ppm, with a 40ppm margin. That seemed on par with Brisbane mains water and I didn't explore that avenue further. I don't have a magnesium test but its perhaps something to explore. I'm open to any other ideas?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ahhh, very interesting aquaholic, thanks! I have since added some calgrit to the tank those snails come from so hopefully that'll help those to come. I haven't rechecked calcium levels yet since adding the calgrit, though i'm a little surprised 120ppm was too low. That test can wait until tomorrow though... Or at least later today! Cheers!

Sent from my Blade S6 using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ahhh hah! It looks like you might be right on the money aquaholic! I tested calcium in the tank those snails came from. It measured 80ppm though from the strength of the reaction i'm thinking it'd be closer to the 40ppm mark. I wouldn't have expected such a rapid(ish) swing but i guess introducing a heap of snails could do that. The calgrit i'd previously added i'd just put as additional substrate. To compemsate for its limited leeching, i've just added some crushed coral to my sump. Hopefully this will enter the water a little quicker. Many thanks and great pick up! :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites



×
×
  • Create New...