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Lyllie

Can you have too much filtration?

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depend on yourr reason for adding the filtere.

is it for more bio filtration, mech, or chem. or just for more flow?

you cnt realy over filter a tank but youcan have to much flow.

bateria will only grow in population as long as they have foodtosustain them.

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To be perfectly honest, I think he wants it because he likes buying things for the tank :) We have a ton of flow from the one we have now so we'd really have to turn them both down otherwise the poor old fish would be think we'd put them on spin cycle.

So I guess what we'd put in it would be whatever would be most beneficial?

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I have an ehiem 2217. Not particularly happy with flow. Have a spare impeller to test out next time i clean it. But if there's not a whole lot of waste I'd suggest a couple layers of the blue sponge it comes with ( maybe a strip of filter floss and then biomedia. I also like to put something cheap like ceramic noodles at the very bottom under the plastic spacer. Helps to disperse flow eliminating shortcuts around media

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P4rker our flow is very average at the moment. I've been waiting on some ISTA quick release taps before I took it apart for a clean, but they arrived today, I'll have a look tomorrow. Hopefully it's just gunked up.

Thanks Heintz :) My husband agrees.

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Provided it passes through as slow as possible.

Water changes for the win. Fish love new, fresh water.

One filter for mechanical filtration eg: sponges and macropore and in the other only one sponge and bio media of your choice. On my 6' tank I had a 2200 canister for mech and a 1500 for bio filter and never had a problem.

I did 2 water changes a week as well, on all of my tanks.

Edited by Heintz.G
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Thanks everyone. One more probably very stupid question but...Does having two filters spread the beneficial bacteria too thinly? Meaning, if one broke would the other have enough to sustain the whole tank? Or does it just not work like that and both will grow bacteria based on how much filtration material it has in it. I hope that makes sense.

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I think alot of people get caught up in the trap of over filtration

Is there a specific reason for adding another filter? flow/redundancy/extra bio filtration?

Does the value of the livestock justify the redundancy in the unlikely event of an accident?

If lack of flow is a concern there is a much cheaper alternative like a wavemaker which is dirt cheap to buy and run

Keep in mind a 20 watt filter consumes 175kw of electricity a year, something to factor in

Adding equipment to an existing tank that has no issues is a waste of money simply put

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In Asia I've seen many heavily stocked tanks with no filtration....just air stones

They probably get water changes every couple of days

Bacteria colonise where oxygen content is greatest.....so there maybe many colonies outside your filters

Lots of filter media doesn't translate to lots of bacteria....amount of bacteria is relavent to to food available

if you over feed and filters are full of rotting food then you will have more bacteria...

I prefer correct filtration(varies relavent to fish type,stocking density), lower flow(which is actually allow bacteria to be more efficent at their job(scientific fact))....then vac tank at weekly water changes....add more filters if it makes you feel better....you are just wasting power....;)

No doubt the industry wants to sell more filters/media/chemicals....perhaps it won't do any harm really....but doesn't necessarily give better results either

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Thanks again guys, much appreciated. All good points to think about.

The only reason he really wants a second filter is because he wants the water as clear as it can be and he was hoping 2 filters would mean twice as long between filter cleans. Not that that really matters, I did the first filter clean today and it wasn't too bad. We attached some quick release valves too so next time it will be easier again.

The cost of replacing our fish is more than a filter would cost us so that's something to consider. But, electricty costs are a valid concern, my husband is sometimes on 24-hour oxygen via concentrator so we don't really need any other huge energy suckers. Lots to consider.

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As mbunamad stated no filter will ever keep an aquarium cleaner than large weekly water changes. Your fish will love you for it too. I run just the single 1100lph canister on my 200l tank( not sure it actually does that much thou) and also have an air stone. I do 70-80% water changes per week and only have a green terror and bristle nose too so don't see the need for anymore filtration. If I had a tank full of Africans or something though I'd def be running another smaller canister for the excess bio load.

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We're doing twice weekly water changes of 30-50% at the moment, mostly because we have brown algae or diatoms (sp?). So the water is clean, there's just lots of little tiny particles floating around. But we're fairly newly cycled so I was hoping it might settle down with a bit of time. We were planning on once weekly but we have loaches are they are SO happy after a water change so...

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Hmmmmm, there's gotta be a reason there's still particles in your water. Do you have fine filter wool packed into the top of your canister? I find that helps heaps. Instead of another canister you could just chuck a tiny little internal power filter with a sponge just to polish up the water in the tank. A smaller one could be hidden easy and it Woolf give you better flow and more water movement I you feel there's not enough.

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the water is clean, there's just lots of little tiny particles floating around.
Hmmmmm, there's gotta be a reason there's still particles in your water.

The particles in the water might also be swimming microbes (algae, rotifers or protozoans) that are multiplying as fast as the filter might remove some of them (many will pass through a filter). Every tank has a population of these and they often "bloom" in a new tank before settling down to lower population levels that cease to be noticeable as the tank matures.

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Like many beliefs....some will never be swayed by "the facts"

That's ok by me...;)

but...you can over filter

chemical filtration often strips water of necessary minerals

and ultimate filtration is an RO unit

no fish can live in pure H2O....;)

Edited by Rod
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