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joller

keeping wild caught rainbows healthy

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I've just had a bit of a look on angfa databases and noticed that quite a few places in my area will find crimson spotted rainbows.

i'm thinking of going out to try and collect some but was just wondering how people keep them healthy in regards to parasites once you bring them home?

Thanks, Joel

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That's scary. I've never seen anything that bad before.

I kept my rainbows in a bare bottom quarantine tank for around a month with salted water and a sponge filter after I caught them. The smaller male had a mangled tail when I caught him but after a couple of weeks it healed up completely.

Is praziquantel a two week treatment ?

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I guess I'm not going to collect anything on the weekend

I wouldn't let Netty put you off, his fish have had just about every piscine disease known to man, that others never get. If there existed a piscine Ebola or Hendra virus, Netty's fish would have caught it. :dance: Go out collecting, always quarantine regardless of the source of the fish. Observe your fish and medicate appropriately .

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I wouldn't let Netty put you off, his fish have had just about every piscine disease known to man, that others never get. If there existed a piscine Ebola or Hendra virus, Netty's fish would have caught it. :dance: Go out collecting, always quarantine regardless of the source of the fish. Observe your fish and medicate appropriately .

Mate, anyone that's kept fish long enough would have encountered just as many imo; only exception is whilst many would just simply discard sick/dead fish, I enjoy digging deeper/reading articles to get a positive ID

Anyhow Joel, don't let that picture deter you, it was more to inform you why quarantining/precautionary care is important - either way it is good practice & should be performed on any fish collected or purchased from the shops. There's plenty of cool native fish/critters that can make brilliant aquarium fish + puddle jumping is heaps fun!

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WTF are those parasites !

Google image 'Clinostomum' which is type of trematode & fairly common apparently

Some background to the picture: this is going back 3 years... group of pond raised boesemani from local breeder acted oddly (lethargic & swim bladder) - all enthuanized and dissected. Pic was shown to microbiologist at QUT (my lecturer) & was unsure of exact sp. but confirmed some type of trematode

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^salt as mentioned & I'd nuke the f*** of the internal worms out with a good dose of praziquantel

here's why

P1240989%20Copy.jpg

Well as that is a Boesmani - a PNG Rainbow - it's not wild caught anyway so irrelevant really. Only thing that photo offers is an illustration of diseases / parasites that can occur. Very very rare to see something like that.

To answer the initial question any fish need to be quarantined no matter if they come from a shop / auction / creek wherever. They may be in premium health when purchased / sourced; but rough handling / rapid temp change / stress can all lead to disease.

Handle all fish as carefully as possible, transported carefully out of the sun and acclimatize slowly. This applies to any fish from anywhere..

Edited by none

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Well as that is a Boesmani - a PNG Rainbow - it's not wild caught anyway so irrelevant really. Only thing that photo offers is an illustration of diseases / parasites that can occur. Very very rare to see something like that.

Rare here because of quarantine laws !

Not rally irrelevant ! If "yellow grubs" are here in ponds they are here in the wild , they use birds as an intermediate host - so somewhere within a birds flying distance is a watercourse with a non indigenous ( new world ) parasite that could spread further .

I do however wonder how these particular trematodes got into Australia .

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I was more deterrd by the permit thing :P

I'm sure they have these laws for a reason

Permits are easy to get. You can buy them in BP petrol stations (the big one at Tweed heads) or on line. A weeks permit costs you about 6 bucks, dead easy to do. We go down to Yamba for holidays and I always buy a permit online , not that I catch anything much at Yamba.

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Plenty of naturally occurring trematodes species actually in Australia. Specifically from the genus Clinostomum in Australia some of the intermediate hosts include herons, egrets, pelicans which we commonly see here in QLD, even frogs are mentioned in the article http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:34856 (happy to send pdf if anyone wants it)

Couldn't find a comprehensive list for QLD but did find a brief list of other parasites in Vic. freshwater fish

http://agriculture.vic.gov.au/fisheries/policy-and-planning/marine-pests-and-diseases/some-parasites-of-freshwater-fish

My bad for derailing the thread but yeah I think everyone's summarized response of quarantine/minimal stress & slow acclimation addresses the original question very well. In regards to the parasites, rare or not, I don't see why prophylactic treatment of salt or other meds shouldn't be used, good insurance imo :ranger:

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Plenty of naturally occurring trematodes species actually in Australia. Specifically from the genus Clinostomum in Australia some of the intermediate hosts include herons, egrets, pelicans which we commonly see here in QLD, even frogs are mentioned in the article http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:34856 (happy to send pdf if anyone wants it)

Couldn't find a comprehensive list for QLD but did find a brief list of other parasites in Vic. freshwater fish

http://agriculture.vic.gov.au/fisheries/policy-and-planning/marine-pests-and-diseases/some-parasites-of-freshwater-fish

My bad for derailing the thread but yeah I think everyone's summarized response of quarantine/minimal stress & slow acclimation addresses the original question very well. In regards to the parasites, rare or not, I don't see why prophylactic treatment of salt or other meds shouldn't be used, good insurance imo :ranger:

Definitely believe in worming wild fish - I have seen them come in with Tapeworms and gill flukes almost every time .

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Netty, you know I was just pulling your chain. I actually admire your knowledge of all thing microbiology, parasitology and fish pathology. You have forgotten more on these subjects than I will ever comprehend.

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i found a decent spot. heaps of rainbows but none went in the trap, gave it 3 goes in the same waterhole, only thing i did different to rainbow runners "how to" vid was that my trap is blue instead of brown, which might help.

i might have another go tomorrow, gonna try a dip net as well.

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i found a decent spot. heaps of rainbows but none went in the trap, gave it 3 goes in the same waterhole, only thing i did different to rainbow runners "how to" vid was that my trap is blue instead of brown, which might help.

i might have another go tomorrow, gonna try a dip net as well.

I have a blue trap from BCF that the fish ignore , the ones we have that work are purpleish brown , we got ours from BigW. about $7.

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