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Mealsy19

Water Change Processes

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Hey Guys

So I have trialed different methods of doing my water changes over the years and I am still tweaking the way/s of doing them. I have tried finding other posts on here related to water changes but haven't come across anything about methods. so I thought I would see what other people do when it comes to their water changes.

I run a 6 x 2hx1.5w tank with a sump roughly 100 ltr sump underneath. My current method of water change is as follows.

1. Turn off the power to the tank with just the lights left running. the water drains from the tank and fills the sump as high as the drains in the tank allow it. usually it gets close to full.

2. I use a small pump to pump the water from the sump out to the garden.

3. I don't have a rainwater tank so I then use the hose from the tap on the house to fill the sump back up to just above where the water stopped when the tanks was drained. (before the sump is filled I let the hose run for about 1 minute before it goes into the sump)

4. I use Prime in the sump water, and using the small pump I used to drain the tank I circulate the water through my sump for about 20 minutes. The heater is running at this stage so the water is usually heated up before it gets pumped back up into the main tank.

5. After the water has cycled the sump for about 20 to 30 minutes I put the power back on and pump it back up into the main tank, add stability and wait for it to settle again that night.

I'm just wondering what other peoples methods are when it comes to changing there tank water.

Post how you do your water changes, both town water and rainwater methods. that way we can all use each others ways and maybe end up finding a better way.

Cheers

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1000 litre IBC. Usually a 50/50 mix of tap and rain water from tank. Age water 20 hours in the IBC. Add Superchlor and let it "age" for another 4 hours. There is a water pump in the IBC that runs 24/7 to keep the water circulating, but you could achieve the same with a large sponge filter in there. IBC is heated during cooler months to 24 degrees, but I run my tanks at ~29 degrees. Drain tanks on to front lawn, refill tanks from IBC via hose attached to water pump. Refill IBC. Repeat the next day.

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1000 litre IBC. Usually a 50/50 mix of tap and rain water from tank. Age water 20 hours in the IBC. Add Superchlor and let it "age" for another 4 hours. There is a water pump in the IBC that runs 24/7 to keep the water circulating, but you could achieve the same with a large sponge filter in there. IBC is heated during cooler months to 24 degrees, but I run my tanks at ~29 degrees. Drain tanks on to front lawn, refill tanks from IBC via hose attached to water pump. Refill IBC. Repeat the next day.

how many tanks do you have? and how many water changes a week do you do?

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Every 2 weeks I drain 1/3 water out of the tanks via garden hose into the garden,

then fill the tanks up again straight from the tap. I use only rainwater.

Filters are left running to mix new water with old.

I have 7 tanks, sizes from 6x2x2 to 18" cube.

Edited by bluebelle

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how many tanks do you have? and how many water changes a week do you do?

10 tanks. Water change every day. 3 Betta grow outs are only 40 litres, and change 50% a day. Takes like 15 minutes. Discus tanks 40% daily for adults, 75%+ daily for grow outs.

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If this system has been working for you so far Mealsy, then good stuff! But am curious how much bacteria would be killed (cleaned) when you are pouring fresh tap (chlorinaated?) water into your sump. Do you lower the sump water level completely, or just to half way, or?

But like I said, if it has worked for two years so far, it obviusly works! :D

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If this system has been working for you so far Mealsy, then good stuff! But am curious how much bacteria would be killed (cleaned) when you are pouring fresh tap (chlorinaated?) water into your sump. Do you lower the sump water level completely, or just to half way, or?

But like I said, if it has worked for two years so far, it obviusly works! :D

sump is pretty much drained completely.

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Way back when i was doing manual water changes: I made U tubes out of PVC pipe that would siphon drain to preset tank depth. 15cm or one third removed. One U tube for every 5 tanks attached to 18 or 25 mm drainage hose. The wider hose allows fast drainage. I used sodium thiosulphate to neutralize. Kept as undissolved crystal as one good sized pinch would neutralize 200 L of tap water easily.

100 tanks - 150 litres each: Turn off sump pumps. Let water settle, start siphons. As soon as first tanks are drained, move siphon over, add pinch of neautralizer and start filling from tap at high speed. With 20 siphons, it would take about 75 minutes to do 100 tanks. Filling was the slowest part and i used a Y Shaped attachment so i could fill 2 adjacent tanks at once. Or a single hook with tap so you can hang the tap hose and leave.

For filling non sumped tanks, i used a water level alarm to stop over flow floods. A modified smoke detector.

Make your U tubes by bending a single pipe, don't use joins or have sharp bends. It's easy to keep siphon going on 25 mm hose when transferring from tank to tank but on bigger hose you can add an end tap to keep siphon primed. (I used swim pool hose on big tanks)

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Yes - that's the set up i currently have except i displace water slowly so water level stays the same. On some racks i filter through a large outdoor pond which is what this set up and most Asian fish farms do. (They are using floating cage system). Very good for natural fish colors.

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If this system has been working for you so far Mealsy, then good stuff! But am curious how much bacteria would be killed (cleaned) when you are pouring fresh tap (chlorinaated?) water into your sump.

That was my first thought too.

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well what is another way of doing it? I used to have tubs that I would put the water into along and I it with hot water from the tap. but I stopped as i was told that the copper will have a bad affect on the fish.

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This is one of my racks, the second will be plumbed the same when i get around to it.

6 Tanks, all with 40mm bulkheads, drains out to the grass. Refill with tap water, plumbed to each tank with 19mm irrigation hose & valves.

Its a old video, quality isnt that flash, but you get the idea.

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Yes - that's the set up i currently have except i displace water slowly so water level stays the same. On some racks i filter through a large outdoor pond which is what this set up and most Asian fish farms do. (They are using floating cage system). Very good for natural fish colors.

[MENTION=470]aquaholic99[/MENTION] I did a quick search on floating cage system, do you have links to more information please.

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The cage system is an aquaculture concept where fish are kept in a small container (traditionally a cage) whilst water (river, lake or tidal flow) travels through. The incoming new water provides essential parameters (oxygen, food, minerals) and outgoing water removes waste. Typically very large fish or heavily stocked fish can be kept in relatively small areas since the cage only restrains the fish, the overall system is much much larger. If you google ' cage culture + aquaculture' you will get an idea but there are many variations on this.

The video you linked to is the same concept. Where does all the incoming water come from? There is a 2-3 acre lake beside the fish shed they pump out of. Where does all the waste water (on floor) end up? Back into the lake. Why can the fish handle such big massive water changes? They are essentially in lake water the whole time. However they are making an artificial river (with water pumps and taps) and glass boxes instead of floating cages in the lake.

Almost all asian fish farms use this concept as it's tried, well proven, low cost and fairly natural. Pond sludge/mud has fantastic bio filtration. Some ponds grow plants as well.

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Thanks for the reply. I did google cage aquaculture and saw the cages in the river, but couldn't work out how this related to the video.

Is there any sort of pre-filter between the pond and the shed? I have seen photos from another Malaysian discus farm where they have a long row of 10,000 litre water tanks behind the shed (counted 8, but there could have been more).

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It depends entirely on the fish farm and their water quality. As a general rule, they keep pumping to a minimum period to save running costs so maximum flow rates (as per your video). Some pump to header tanks which can be treated if needed and use gravity to flow through. Some farms just keep input and return separated within the lake. Better water quality doesn't need any pre-filtering. Unreliable water/rainfall would promote use of water storage tanks.

If you locate a fish farm your interested in, use google earth to see how large/close their water source is.

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