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Sometimes I have thoughts about tanks I would like to do.

Or nifty tricks that could eliminate the work.

And I imagine others do to.

Which means a thread like this could have some fun.

So add 'em if ya got 'em.

So... today right? Looking for a bit of driftwood to make a moss tree. Is not easy to find.

I looked at my driftwood. All too big and clunky.

And thought, I should just whittle one of them down!

Why I have not thought of this before..... I do not know as I am a man who owns many mora.

One nano moss tree trunk coming up.

Perhaps not the best idea to start the thread with, but hopefully start it, it did.

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If you can swing it, mount your lights from above so they are suspended above the tank not sitting across the top hindering access. You can always move a light... but it always seems to be in the way when its sitting on the glass.

I make "sky hooks" from bent fencing wire that sticks into the leg holder slot used by many LED fittings. 4mm drip irrigation hose threaded over the wire makes a "nice" handle. The bent wire "handles" hangs off the rack but I can slide each light along or "unclip" to move or remove it.

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This is a basic one but I'm always surprised how few people know this trick

For those canisters that you have just cleaned out, set back up as normal and instead of filling the canister, spilling water, struggling to get bubbles out, or any of that standing around with a hose business, simply chuck a small powerhead on the intake hose and wait/walk away till the water is coming out bubble free from the canister outlet, then just switch the canister on. If you forget to come back the canister still has aerated water going through so your bacteria will be fine still and only using the tank water means no overflows. Simples.

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Plastic stem throw away ear buds make excellent impeller shafts for canisters, internal power filters, powerheads etc if you break the ceramic one and need to wait for parts. Do need to trim to length with a sharp knife.

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Plastic stem throw away ear buds make excellent impeller shafts for canisters, internal power filters, powerheads etc if you break the ceramic one and need to wait for parts. Do need to trim to length with a sharp knife.

Haha, reminds me of the time I fixed the axel on a mechanical fuel pump with a paper clip on the side of the road, worked so well that I forgot it was there and only found it when the car went in for a carbie tune and the mechanic called me to tell me of its existence.

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The circular glass beads that line the edges of some tanks are actually hollow like a straw. I salvaged a few and find them incredibly useful for harvesting bbs and then feeding the babies. You put your finger over the end, dip it in the hatchery, let your finger off and it sucks up all the bbs. Then point it over the fry in the tank and all the food falls out right on top of them. Also works if you put microworms or crushed flake in a glass of water to suck them up. You can feed cichlid fry this way without freaking out the parents.

You can also catch straying fry in the straw, or use it to remove dead ones, or other muck. It really is the handiest thing For raising fry

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The circular glass beads that line the edges of some tanks are actually hollow like a straw. I salvaged a few and find them incredibly useful for harvesting bbs and then feeding the babies. You put your finger over the end, dip it in the hatchery, let your finger off and it sucks up all the bbs. Then point it over the fry in the tank and all the food falls out right on top of them. Also works if you put microworms or crushed flake in a glass of water to suck them up. You can feed cichlid fry this way without freaking out the parents.

You can also catch straying fry in the straw, or use it to remove dead ones, or other muck. It really is the handiest thing For raising fry

Good tip!

I use disposable 1ml plastic pipettes (100 packs) that you squeeze and a turkey baster for larger diameter/volumes. Useful for moving frontosa eggs around.

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it has 1001 uses, I even marked the 5ml line so that I can easily obtain water samples for testing ph etc, put it in up until the 5mm line put your finger on the end then release into the vial. you can even use it to remove fungus eggs if the parents aren't doing it properly. The one I use atm is about 500mm long so easily gets the bottom of a tank

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I find that Bunnings/masters are an endless source of inspiration for adapting stuff for the Hobby. As is the Japanese discount store at Indooroopilly Daiso, as well as all those places like Reject shop, crazy clarks (if they still exist), also been known to walk out of Ikea with stuff for adaptation.

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I have one of those Little Juey heads fitted to my stihl brush cutter and my parents one. The plastic line refills which I go through a few of in a summer come in a plastic tube which is open at both ends when you take the caps off. It is the same diameter as the tube that fits on a sponge filter. Very handy if you are adding a plastic bottle full of K1 to a sponge filter. As many uses besides.

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A visit to Aquatic7's house a few months back, I learned a neat trick. You can make insulated tank lids out of cellular polycarbonate sheeting. Strong, lightweight, clear and the double skin acts as an insulation similar to double glazing and will allow light to pass through easily.

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The other place that is ace to find inspiration is Reverse Garbage in Woolongabba. http://www.reversegarbageqld.com.au

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A visit to Aquatic7's house a few months back, I learned a neat trick. You can make insulated tank lids out of cellular polycarbonate sheeting. Strong, lightweight, clear and the double skin acts as an insulation similar to double glazing and will allow light to pass through easily.

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The other place that is ace to find inspiration is Reverse Garbage in Woolongabba. http://www.reversegarbageqld.com.au

Dam wish I knew this before I dumped a few 100m of the stuff

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A visit to Aquatic7's house a few months back, I learned a neat trick. You can make insulated tank lids out of cellular polycarbonate sheeting. Strong, lightweight, clear and the double skin acts as an insulation similar to double glazing and will allow light to pass through easily.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]72040[/ATTACH]

The other place that is ace to find inspiration is Reverse Garbage in Woolongabba. http://www.reversegarbageqld.com.au

100 bucks if you can find a aquarium related use for the old dental mold of people's teeth!!!

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That's pretty easy. Moulds are made from plaster of paris. Perfect for buffering hardness. Have a look at turtle blocks (to keep water from going acidic).

God dam, is there anything you don't know.

Mouths are creepy

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I find that Bunnings/masters are an endless source of inspiration for adapting stuff for the Hobby. As is the Japanese discount store at Indooroopilly Daiso, as well as all those places like Reject shop, crazy clarks (if they still exist), also been known to walk out of Ikea with stuff for adaptation.

Omg daiso is like my favourite store!

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Bunnings sell that polycarb. I'll be using that on most of my tanks from now one. Note it blocks a lot of ultraviolet light..

Sent from my SM-G920I using Tapatalk

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I love buying pipe cleaners and bottle brushes from $2 stores to clean filter hoses, impellers and the tiny outlet holes in spray bars.

We used a yoga Matt cut to size as the foam for our marine 6x2 tank. Could also use camping foam flooring or kids alphabet square foam pieces from a $2 shop.

Always allow hand and net access to a sump...it's a great place to house a fish that's being picked on, while you reshuffle the tanks in your house.

Keep a clean empty esky in your car for last minute fish collection/buying. Eskys are fantastic for transporting fish/live rock/ invertebrates/axolotls when moving house. Much hardier than a Styrofoam box!

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Sorry for the double post...tried to remember and fit it all into the one...

When live bearers are birthing in a community tank...provide lots of live plants for babies to hide in (so they don't get eaten by parents or tank mates). Atm I'm loving the duckweed growing in my 'baby tank' as it means that fry still have access to the surface and food, while I don't have to try to catch them all and put into a fry/birthing net/enclosure.

When I wash my birthing nets I do so on a gentle cycle in a bra bag in the washing machine, to ensure the netting doesn't rip or tear. Before use ... I quickly swish it in some tank water (removed and in a container) before settling it up in the tank.

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