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cturner1

how are fish able to live in my pond without an aerator/pump?

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My pond (which is really just a pool that hasn't been looked after for years) has no pump or aerator and yet fish are still able to live in it. as i am adding some more native catfish to the pond, I've been doing research and i have not seen any pages where people have a self sustaining pond without use of a filter/pump, which brings me to wonder, how are fish able to live in my pond? I have no plants in it ( hopefully this will change soon) yet there is a hard, thick algae muck that is all over the pond. most of it has sunk to the bottom, although theres a few bucketsfull worth that are floating on the top. the inhabitants of the pond are: a salmon tail catfish, 100s of firetail gudgeons, 100s of guppies, 50-70 convict cichlids, 12 crayfish.

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I can answer that, the bubbles in tanks do not do much to aerate the water but it does change the surface water in contact with the air and that is where oxygen transfer takes place. Dams with no flow have very little oxygen below 2 or 3 metres and the water is "dead" because that is as deep as any wave action can take effect. Occasionally and without notice a dam can turn-over with the "dead water" coming to the top and causing fish kills. It does not happen often but it is one of the things to look for when investigating a fish kill in still water.

In sewage treatment plants they use surface thrashers with large HP motors to beat oxygen into the surface water when it needs it, they never blow bubbles through it.

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To add to Bottomfeeders answer, Algae will also convert C02 to oxygen during the day, at night it will use oxygen.

If you notice more fish swimming along the top of the water first thing in the morning than during the day then this can mean a lack of oxygen overnight and the inhabitants would prefer you to provide some sort of surface agitation (pump, bubbles etc.)

One of the main reasons we use airpumps and filters in aquariums is to keep a higher density of fish in a smaller space.

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