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Not many cichlid fans would be happy about that lol.

Thing is koi herpes doesnt always kill rapidly. Plenty people in the world with infected fish. Symptoms can be kept at bay using lysine fortified foods.

hopefully one of the researchers happens upon this comment. It would be very useful information for them

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Masses of dead beefy carp will to pollute super quick choking the rest of the wildlife or super nutrient blooms.

I wonder who they will employ to do the clean up job? will they call for volunteers or maybe one of the new subs lol

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The're investing 15 million in the program with much of that going towards clean up. It's estimated the carp cause up to 500million a year in damage to the economy. why is the government paying for this rather than the primary producers that it impacts?

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I hope they got it right for the virus not affecting any other species be it in or out of the water, or the possibility of cross contamination / mutation. Research tests only done from Europe, so conditions aren't exactly the same here.

Imagine a kangaroo or wombat herpes or koala chlamydia coming in contact with the proposed koi one lol and I don't mean via 'koi-pulation'.

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The're investing 15 million in the program with much of that going towards clean up. It's estimated the carp cause up to 500million a year in damage to the economy. why is the government paying for this rather than the primary producers that it impacts?

Because the government are the only ones allowed to release viruses like this. And if it goes pear shape the private sector doesn't want to be held liable. The pollies can just go welp that didnt work, it ws all kevin rudds fault.

always plan to be sued

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It's a sad thing when any government decides to unleash a organism killing virus for any reason.

I have serious concerns about it, as already stated dead fish rotting in waterways isn't a good thing. What happens when another animal eats them? (We may be told that it's safe...but is it really?) Why polute our waterways more than what they already are?

How can anyone predict which fish will become top dog after this? My guess is Tilapia.

It's the canetoad all over again.

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dead fish rotting in waterways
Extremely short term pain for long term gain. Carp have been the major cause of decline in Australian river health and native fish populations for decades. I very much doubt a small temporary blip in the organic loading of the waterways is going to be a topic of discussion for historians. Hell we might even see a boom in the yabbie population and a bounce back of the Murray River Crayfish. That would be awesome.

The Macrobrachium will be in the fat paddock too.... and we know how much yellow belly and bream love a macro!

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Its quite specific about its hosts. The problem is that it doesn't just kill 'em, wham bam thank you ma'am style.

Biological warfare is not the squeaky clean option many think. Its brutal. I dont oppose this plan, but I do feel a bit alone in the standpoint that we are about to do something a bit..... evil. End justifys the means right? Well in that case lets spend a few million on biological weapons and not bother with the lame F35 planes. Bio weapons have srs intimidation factor because its a horrible way to go.

The carp are an enemy. They arent part of Geneva convention. Even so though..... its not going to be pretty.

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I don't sympathyse the carp, I share grubs point of view that and sympathyse the native species that are being 'biologically controlled' but the karp.

They're not expecting to instantly kill all karp, the're forecasting a 95% reduction in numbers over 30 years. Most fish die within 24 hours of showing symptoms and most fish will start showing symptoms a week after infection. The major concern is that population estimates might be wrong and that the amount of dead fish is greater than foreseen. But the government is going to pay to clean up the dead fish

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have you? given that its not present in australia (apart from CSIRO labs) i'd say most would not have seen it

Edited by joller

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When it gets into pet goldfish..... how should those in trade advise people? They are just gonna see what looks like melted wax on their fish. Euthanasia?

If we worry about things from our tanks getting into creeks..... we also need to worry about things from creeks getting into tanks.

Duality of man.

For the natives

And

For the pet goldies too.

Going to make taking elodea from creek much more risky.

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Testing shows goldfish are not affected by this virus and my understanding is that the virus is of a type that doesn't readily mutate.

.. but I do wonder how long the virus remains viable outside of a carp just floating down the waterway. (I'd worry more if I kept Koi).

My girls have pet rabbits and keep them alive OK. I suspect dedicated Koi keepers will manage some simple security procedures like not feeding their fish wild elodea.

Edited by Grubs

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Touche.

Getting myself confused with the 3 strains.

Thought there was just the one.

Koi herpesvirus ~ Cyprinid herpesvirus 3; CyHV3

Carp pox virus ~ Cyprinid herpesvirus 1; CyHV1

Goldfish hematopoietic necrosis virus ~ Cyprinid herpesvirus 2; CyHV2

Virus is usually dead after 3 days outside of a fish. Less if you heat treat the water.

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