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PlecFan

What is THIS!!??

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So was just transferring some fish and noticed these... Little tiny red worms... What are they? There doesn't appear to be any on the fish but while I was taking the video you can see them trying to get under the fish.... Resemble Mosquito larvae and I'm hoping that's all it is. Fish are in good health, good solid poos, fat healthy, and lots of breeding going on in that tank (that's the reason I was moving these guys) no injuries or spots of concern on them..

Right in the centre of the pic you can see the red worm. I've got a video but can't seem to upload it. If anyone can tell me how I'll put the video up.

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Edited by PlecFan

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It's an indoor tank set up next to a window and sliding door that is generally always open. My partner reckons it looks like Mozzy larvae but I'm not convinced. They seem too thin for larvae but move in the same fashion as Mozzy larvae. If it's the worst case what treatment kills the camallanus? The tank IS due for worming too I might add

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Blood worm ? Look up a pic of them alive... are there brown log like things ( upto 1cm) on the bottom of wherever ?

I looked up some websites and found this pic. The ones I saw when relocating the fish look like the one on the bottom left of the picture. There was two of them and they were about 1cm long, thin as string and red. I can't see them anywhere in the tank or gravel now tho, even when I stir up the gravel.

I couldn't identify from that site wether all the worms on that pic were blood worm or not tho. Some pictures I look at they look like camallanus and some websites they look like early stage blood worm... I can't decide but in haste I pulled the fish back out and inspected them head to tail and there doesn't seem to be any sign of them anywhere on or in (coming out of) the fish. Said fish are pigs with food, solid and healthy and you can also see in the first pic that poos are solid and large.... I don't want to treat unnecessarily but reading up on the camallanus says this type of worm can be hard to diagnose until advanced infestations?? I wish I could post the video as its a lot better to see the movement of the worms

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Edited by PlecFan

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This is exactly how the ones I had were moving. Same shape, size, movements just the ones I had were red not white. When they were swimming they wriggled like crazy but when they were on the bottom they moved like the ones in this clip that are called hair worms? Or planaria? Just the ones I saw were red not white.... Oh please tell me they are harmless lol I could not deal with an infestation in that tank!

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Most worms found in aquariums are harmless. The parasites dont generally live long outside a host. They are scared of light though as that leads them to being seen and eaten.

Oh Donny I hope you are right, I think I would quit if that particular tank had a harmful infestation

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Its hard to see on my p.o.s phone ( looks sort of segmented with legs? ) but it looks like a bristleworm ? If it is it is pretty harmless ( from what I remember off hand) found in both fresh and salt water in a more 'mature' tank. They get a lot bigger then that one

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Google Detritus worms, could be that also harmless and the fish will eat them.

I looked up detritus but everything reads that they are a white worm. These were defiantly pink/red color.....

Edited by PlecFan

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What is THIS!!??

lets face it - its a very poor photograph of a something that is too blurry and too small to identify. It could be a segmented annelid worm, it could be a non-segmented nematode, it could be an insect larvae... (it could be fluff of a jumper when you cant see it move!).

Your photo simply isn't good enough to identify even the phylum the animal comes from so all suggestions are going to be stabs in the dark. If you find any more perhaps try holding a magnifying glass between your camera and the "worm" - even hand held this can work well. Take 20-30 pictures and post the sharpest one. Colour is a poor character to identify by as it varies. We need to see if its segmented, has a distinct head capsule, perhaps some tiny legs, how sharp/blunt the pointy ends are etc. Even then, all you can really determine is that if it has a head and segmented body its probably an insect larvae which tells you its most likely NOT parasitic. If its a worm (no head) then it could be harmless and just from the aquarium, or it could be a flesh eating brain sucking gut muncher that crawled out of the fish. You'd really need to see it crawling out of a fish or in fish poo to tell the difference.

Perhaps isolate a fish in a very clean bucket and see if more wrigglers miraculously appear - that might tell you if its a parasite.

Edited by Grubs

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Thanks grubs. I've got a video but can't load it. I'll do what you said, I'll catch the same 7 fish out and place in a clean bucket and see what happens. I'll do it now actually....

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lets face it - its a very poor photograph of a something that is too blurry and too small to identify. It could be a segmented annelid worm, it could be a non-segmented nematode, it could be an insect larvae... (it could be fluff of a jumper when you cant see it move!).

Your photo simply isn't good enough to identify even the phylum the animal comes from so all suggestions are going to be stabs in the dark. If you find any more perhaps try holding a magnifying glass between your camera and the "worm" - even hand held this can work well. Take 20-30 pictures and post the sharpest one. Colour is a poor character to identify by as it varies. We need to see if its segmented, has a distinct head capsule, perhaps some tiny legs, how sharp/blunt the pointy ends are etc. Even then, all you can really determine is that if it has a head and segmented body its probably an insect larvae which tells you its most likely NOT parasitic. If its a worm (no head) then it could be harmless and just from the aquarium, or it could be a flesh eating brain sucking gut muncher that crawled out of the fish. You'd really need to see it crawling out of a fish or in fish poo to tell the difference.

Perhaps isolate a fish in a very clean bucket and see if more wrigglers miraculously appear - that might tell you if its a parasite.

So during the process of pulling the fish back out and stirring up the tank, I noticed some of the same worms in the water swimming around having a lovely time in MY tank! I did a few swishes with the net through the water and jiggled out these feral little freaks into a bowl.

I only have the iPad to take photos but they do in fact seem segmented. Here are some better photos. They seem to just be swimming around the tank making themselves quite at home!! You have to disturb the tank it seems to see them. They also seem to be almost white in the tank but when removed to the bowl they turned pink/red....

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Well I'm confident of two things now after a day and a half of research!

a) the worms are not parasitic due to the amount of them in the gravel and water and

B) I'm over feeding the bottom racks where gravel vaccing is not as effective and it's these tanks I've found them in (both bottom tanks) not to say they are not in the top tanks but I know the top tanks get a lot better results from the gravel vac then the bottom due to little to no fall. I was using the eheim quick vac pro ( battery operated ) but stopped as I found the mesh as fine as it is still leeched the blitzed debris back into the water making it cloudy and unsightly.

I've been mucking with these little things all day and can pull them apart into multiple smaller segments and the segments just keep swimming around as if nothing happened! So I'm going to do wc every 3 days for the next two weeks, drop down the feeds to every second day and see what happens. Hopefully that will reduce the numbers.

One thing I'm so happy about is that they are not parasitic! I can deal with free loaders as long as they are not affecting my babies! Lol

While on the topic - what's the best way to vac bottom racks? As said above, I have the battery operated one but it's pretty useless.

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Wrap some fine white filter matt around the outside of quickvac and hold in place with rubber bands. Gives that water a second polish. I use stuff thats almost like felt and can be washed heaps of times before it goes fluffy.

Edited by Donny@ageofaquariums

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Another method is to use a filter sock. Buy or make a sock holder. Place on tank you want to clean. Place a filter sock in it. Then place a pump into tank you want to clean. Put hose onto pump and then a snorkle hard pipe from canister onto hose. Might have to cut down the snorkle bit to get it to hook onto sock nicely.

Anyway you turn off main system pump or even better isolate tank to be cleaned from it. Then turn on pump going into filter sock. Then scrub algae in tank and stir up gravel. Pump will pump tanks water into the sock. sock will strain out debris and let clean water return to tank.

After about a beer or so, you can remove sock and clean. Then remove contraption to next tank. It gets expensive if you have lots of tanks on system.... especially if you drink import rather than domestic.

Sneaky trick i use when cleaning sumps. That said i hate cleaning socks almost as much as sumps....

Edited by Donny@ageofaquariums

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Cheers [MENTION=5455]Donny[/MENTION]@agofaquariums 👍I'll try the wool on the quick vac first and see how that goes. The second method I cant even picture in my head let alone build one lol I've been using a basic pump with hose attached, sucking the waste off of the top of the sand and then stirring sand at the end while letting the pump run but its been painful and not very effective (obviously) for really getting a good clean. But now that I have the equivalent of aquatic earthworms somethings gotta give before I end up with amonea and nitrite spikes. Maybe I'll do away with the substrate all together on the bottom tanks....

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Trying to explain using a phone to type is brutal but its hella simple lol. Will take a pic of my rig for ya sometime and you will be all like "huh so its just a pump with hose on it" and i will be all like "yea i just suck at explaining g" and then yea lol and stuff.

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I agree that it's hard to tell from the picture, but I'm thinking black worms. Have you fed any to your fish? I have a colony that live in my gravel and they breed like crazy. I have tiny little white worms that float around in the current which I assume are the babies. It's great because my silver dollar fry are self sufficient and my clown loaches have a living smorgasboard of worms from the gravel. My adult silver dollars also eat the black worms if they float by. By the way - plenty of baby SDs from the latest mega-spawning - just saying!

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Oh and just want to say its rather awesome to have grubs posting here too. A very experienced aquarist indeed. Max respec'

I read grubs posts to learn things and so should you

:)

I read everyone's posts Donny, it's why I come here to ask questions, lots of great advice from people here! a good bunch 👍

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I agree that it's hard to tell from the picture, but I'm thinking black worms. Have you fed any to your fish? I have a colony that live in my gravel and they breed like crazy. I have tiny little white worms that float around in the current which I assume are the babies. It's great because my silver dollar fry are self sufficient and my clown loaches have a living smorgasboard of worms from the gravel. My adult silver dollars also eat the black worms if they float by. By the way - plenty of baby SDs from the latest mega-spawning - just saying!

I don't feed black worms mate, only frozen bloodworm for the 333s otherwise it's all fresh veg and pellets. I'm not sure how they got into my tanks to be honest but they are there

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[MENTION=17069]PlecFan[/MENTION] I think you are on the right track. The co-occurrence of the worms with detritus is very common. Potentially over-feeding or just could be harder to clean the bottom row of the rack because you have less suction when siphoning. I suspect a little more attention to both and the population of worms in the tank will reduce. Mind you they are probably good fish food so not all bad. Shooting from the hip I'd say yours are closer to Tubifex worms than they are to blackworms. There is a large family of worms called the Naididae that include Tubifex and a large number of similar "sludge worms" - very thin, soft segmented worms, often with bristles on the side and lacking in pigment but showing a little red from the haemoglobin in their blood (like us!) that helps them breathe in low oxygen sludgy environments. Blackworms in contrast are more robust worms more closely related to earthworms.

Throw a couple of cory's in the tank. They will love you.

[MENTION=5455]Donny[/MENTION] - pot calling the kettle black.. but cheers.

Edited by Grubs

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[MENTION=17069]PlecFan[/MENTION] I think you are on the right track. The co-occurrence of the worms with detritus is very common. Potentially over-feeding or just could be harder to clean the bottom row of the rack because you have less suction when siphoning. I suspect a little more attention to both and the population of worms in the tank will reduce. Mind you they are probably good fish food so not all bad. Shooting from the hip I'd say yours are closer to Tubifex worms than they are to blackworms. There is a large family of worms called the Naididae that include Tubifex and a large number of similar "sludge worms" - very thin, soft segmented worms, often with bristles on the side and lacking in pigment but showing a little red from the haemoglobin in their blood (like us!) that helps them breathe in low oxygen sludgy environments. Blackworms in contrast are more robust worms more closely related to earthworms.

Throw a couple of cory's in the tank. They will love you.

[MENTION=5455]Donny[/MENTION] - pot calling the kettle black.. but cheers.

Good information there grubs in nice easy laymens terms that suit me thanks mate I appreciate your help 👍

[MENTION=9246]Donny@ageofaquariums[/MENTION] a pic of you get up would be great thanks mate

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