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Owning a small marine tank - what's involved?

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After getting more interested in my tropical tanks at home, I'm thinking about a small marine tank. I've always loved them, but believed them to be too much effort for what I'm prepared to put in. Anyone able to give a quick overview on how much work is involved - water change frequency, hardware costs, fish/coral cost and lifespan, etc, etc. The Techden has a great little (nano?) setup on their counter with a tiny little tang (I think?) which looks cool. To me, just like plants in a tropical tank, coral/rock is what makes a marine tank, so definitely interested in learning about coral.

TIA!

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They're a freshwater tank with salt in it, if you've kept freshwater for any period of time shouldn't be to much trouble. There's only a few different items to get as well

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They're a freshwater tank with salt in it, if you've kept freshwater for any period of time shouldn't be to much trouble. There's only a few different items to get as well

Ahhh, not so sure lol. myself and some others that tried found it to be far more time consuming and expensive. maybe we missed something...

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Maybe I miss a lot, but I've never found it time consuming. I get or buy NSW change water fortnightly same as my freshwater tanks, clean filters same as other tanks apart from the skimmer, test water same as other tank only extra is salinity check and on occasion I check calcium, magnesium and phosphate. I Stock the tanks lightly which I believe cuts maintenance dramatically but this is the exact same as freshwater fish. I choose fish and corals that suit my level of skills and time I have. If it took me along time to do anything with aquariums I wouldn't be doing it as I wouldn't have the time

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Choose your own difficulty adventure. You just need someone to show you the basics. Match the tank to your time and budget. Dont get greedy, rush things or keep things that need conditions you dont have the tech to provide.

When I hear people say they are hard, I think back to when people said the same thing about African cichlids and lol.

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It depends on ur experience. The nano would be about the worst way to start, go as big as you can...more like a 3ft. Fish only to start off too corals just ad the big bucks.( if you want a decently setup tank with corals, itll cost you $1000/ft of tank length) Research more, read more books as well. If you have easy access to ocean that makes things abit easier and cheaper. You know your experience, free time and how much you want to put into it. There's a lot of diff info. 'Masa' is the marine forum

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The difference between salt and fresh is that saltwater don't come outta ya tap!

Making up saltwater, storing and changing is likely the biggest new challenge an experienced freshwater aquarist faces when moving to marine.

Small tanks are much easier to water change, so as long as you water change.... small tanks are easier.

Also cheaper. Way cheaper.

And if you decide marine is not for you.... then meh.

But if you went big, it can be brutal.

Its too simple to say big or small is harder.

I always pushed big marines on n00bies in the past, but these days I recommend smaller ones.

The lessons you learn are much cheaper on a small scale, as are the solutions.

Don.

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The difference between salt and fresh is that saltwater don't come outta ya tap!

Making up saltwater, storing and changing is likely the biggest new challenge an experienced freshwater aquarist faces when moving to marine.

What's involved in changing the water? I live 400m near the beach, but imagine it might contain incompatible impurities. I good friend owns a trawler, and could probably bring back 20L containers as often as required (how often is that?).

Finally, what nano tank would you recommend for total solution (including filter, light, heater?, etc). Would I need a heater/chiller?

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When I had a marine tank, I used to get salt water from Sandgate at high tide. Never had any issues but it was a long time ago.

As to how often, it would depend on the size of the tank and how you would be storing it. I used to find keeping it aerated would be fine for a week or two.

Heater/chiller would depend on what you were keeping. As I used to keep 'local' fish I didn't have to bother to much about it.

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The difference between salt and fresh is that saltwater don't come outta ya tap!

Making up saltwater, storing and changing is likely the biggest new challenge an experienced freshwater aquarist faces when moving to marine.

Small tanks are much easier to water change, so as long as you water change.... small tanks are easier.

Also cheaper. Way cheaper.

And if you decide marine is not for you.... then meh.

But if you went big, it can be brutal.

Its too simple to say big or small is harder.

I always pushed big marines on n00bies in the past, but these days I recommend smaller ones.

The lessons you learn are much cheaper on a small scale, as are the solutions.

Don.

don't say that my first marine is 700 gallons.. lol

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