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liquidg

With marines over freshwater, beauty is not just possible, its a certainty!!!

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Don't get me wrong, there are some nice looking fish in freshwater displays and a few reasonable looking plants, but just this one pic from my bottom basic tank in one ordinary corner of simplistic to keep marine aquarium algae and large polyp coral living together and ever expanding, ummmm freshwater on this level sort of cant compete!! lol
coral-and-alage-b-t-_zpstfu8qnvq.jpg
 

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lol, rrrriigghht, yeh I suppose it would if you were not aware of these things and have not seen such colours in an aquarium, and mouldy rock melon??  I have never seen that so I suppose I cant compare it to what ever . 

So mouldy stuff hey? hhmmmm, okay here are some mouldy grapes and apples and cherries and maybe more, I suppose if I did not know I would place such names on these as well?? nahhh, lol, lol

1-flower-algae-9-8-16-_zpsgc8duylt.jpg

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12 hours ago, liquidg said:

Don't get me wrong, there are some nice looking fish in freshwater displays and a few reasonable looking plants, but just this one pic from my bottom basic tank in one ordinary corner of simplistic to keep marine aquarium algae and large polyp coral living together and ever expanding, ummmm freshwater on this level sort of cant compete!! lol
coral-and-alage-b-t-_zpstfu8qnvq.jpg
 

if only there wasn't bubble algae too :( 

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13 hours ago, liquidg said:

Don't get me wrong, there are some nice looking fish in freshwater displays and a few reasonable looking plants, but just this one pic from my bottom basic tank in one ordinary corner of simplistic to keep marine aquarium algae and large polyp coral living together and ever expanding, ummmm freshwater on this level sort of cant compete!! lol
coral-and-alage-b-t-_zpstfu8qnvq.jpg
 

What are some easy to keep corals for beginners? I'm starting my small 100L marine tank up this weekend and starting off with fish only and live rock to begin with but will eventually progress to corals.

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1 hour ago, gene4567 said:

What are some easy to keep corals for beginners? I'm starting my small 100L marine tank up this weekend and starting off with fish only and live rock to begin with but will eventually progress to corals.

have to agree, very pretty.

but i also see a little piglet trying to escape,  someone's mouth puffing on a smoke, a little ducking snugglling down and a scary mask kinda thing with fruit? / berries? on the top of the mask.

what can i say, i see the weirdest things.

 

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It looks nice but it's not my preference. I just cant justify running a chiller 24/7 with 1000 watts of hid metal halides or some sort of equivalent over the top lighting array and the power bill that comes with that.  I was talking to a good friend about salt water a few days ago and he said its hard to keep corals alive for long periods of time and that most tanks even the ones in big aquarium shops are constantly cycling out the dead ones with new specimens. I assume those in the picture are new to the tank ? If i swapped to salt water my 2000 litres worth of display tanks would send me broke in 6 months. I might sound a bit jaded but it's just how i feel about salt water tanks, but please don't stop doing what you love because i will always need dead coral/live rock and coral sands for my tangs :)

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9 hours ago, gene4567 said:

What are some easy to keep corals for beginners? I'm starting my small 100L marine tank up this weekend and starting off with fish only and live rock to begin with but will eventually progress to corals.

Start with leather, morphs or anything in euphyllia family aka hammers, frogspawn and torches... Still require a level of care but is a good starting place

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11 hours ago, gene4567 said:

What are some easy to keep corals for beginners? I'm starting my small 100L marine tank up this weekend and starting off with fish only and live rock to begin with but will eventually progress to corals.

Do not use live rock!!!! Base rock!!!

To quote some of those corals you first need to understand how varied corals function!
You have seen the letters LPS and SPS, well lps are of the large polyp species, the larger polyp is that way to utilise weaker light and feed more affective on plankton.
All but a few species of corals and that includes anemones, the colour you see in them is the algae, all coral flesh is white to translucent, no colour at all.
The more flesh symbiotic as is LPS with light dependent algae with in the corals cells, is just like say a cup being like SPS out in the rain to catch the water compared to a large tub to do the same thing, obviously the tub being like LPS will catch more rain, just like a larger polyp will collect more available light.
These are easier to keep.
Fleshy corals like leathers are more prone to flesh eating life forms as in bacterial attacks then protists will finish off the dying flesh, you need a more so matured aquarium for them for the long term.
Now LPS is better in semi low light then SPS usually, but if you cant attain a very high water quality, then most SPS will make do with weaker lighting as well.
Obviously SPS means small polyps species like stag horn corals and many SPS are of the acropora range.
Best corals to keep are acans and encrusting types of stony sps.
Corals fight, so do not keep varied species to near to each other.
All corals need good flow to keep food and oxygen up to them and rubbish that causes bacterial attacks, off them.
All corals need temps no higher then 26c best at 24c.
To protect corals use hydrogen peroxide to enhance oxygen levels and to fight off hair algae and cyano via syringe placed on it of pure food grade peroxide. 
Corals are far easier then fish for the long term!

 

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23 hours ago, Lictoga said:

Looks like a mouldy rock melon to me. But each to there own 

So the blue algae called lobophora is like mouldy rock melon, lol, you try keeping a blue plant, {in sea water is algae of course,} always under water and have it thrive and spread in freshwater?

I think there is the Bucephalandra is blue, but its leaves are above the water, ours are well down there glowing away , lol.

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Sorry if that came off as insulating, night shift brain  at the moment. 

I think its because i honestly have no idea what im looking at, and that was the first ting thay poped in my head and unfortunately i didn't filter it.

 

Ill edit my first post

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9 hours ago, liquidg said:

Do not use live rock!!!! Base rock!!!

To quote some of those corals you first need to understand how varied corals function!
You have seen the letters LPS and SPS, well lps are of the large polyp species, the larger polyp is that way to utilise weaker light and feed more affective on plankton.
All but a few species of corals and that includes anemones, the colour you see in them is the algae, all coral flesh is white to translucent, no colour at all.
The more flesh symbiotic as is LPS with light dependent algae with in the corals cells, is just like say a cup being like SPS out in the rain to catch the water compared to a large tub to do the same thing, obviously the tub being like LPS will catch more rain, just like a larger polyp will collect more available light.
These are easier to keep.
Fleshy corals like leathers are more prone to flesh eating life forms as in bacterial attacks then protists will finish off the dying flesh, you need a more so matured aquarium for them for the long term.
Now LPS is better in semi low light then SPS usually, but if you cant attain a very high water quality, then most SPS will make do with weaker lighting as well.
Obviously SPS means small polyps species like stag horn corals and many SPS are of the acropora range.
Best corals to keep are acans and encrusting types of stony sps.
Corals fight, so do not keep varied species to near to each other.
All corals need good flow to keep food and oxygen up to them and rubbish that causes bacterial attacks, off them.
All corals need temps no higher then 26c best at 24c.
To protect corals use hydrogen peroxide to enhance oxygen levels and to fight off hair algae and cyano via syringe placed on it of pure food grade peroxide. 
Corals are far easier then fish for the long term!

 

Why should I not use live rock?

My plan was to start off with a few kilos of base rock then introduce live rock once the tank has cycled and hopefully have the live rock seed the base rock this was purely to cut down on some costs of setting up)

 

Thanks for the coral advice, I was looking at beginning with mushrooms and button polyps. 

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If your going to cycle with base rock why add live rock after? Forget all the pretty hitchikers and what not and stick with your base rock! Your already doing the hard yards at the start by cycling with dry base rock so stick with that. If you want to seed the cycle get sand from matured tank or marine pure! Iv just finished cycling my second tank with just base rock and seeded it with one piece of live rock from matured tank. Age of aquariums has some awesome south sea base rock it's so porous

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18 hours ago, Soarer said:

It looks nice but it's not my preference. I just cant justify running a chiller 24/7 with 1000 watts of hid metal halides or some sort of equivalent over the top lighting array and the power bill that comes with that.  I was talking to a good friend about salt water a few days ago and he said its hard to keep corals alive for long periods of time and that most tanks even the ones in big aquarium shops are constantly cycling out the dead ones with new specimens. I assume those in the picture are new to the tank ? If i swapped to salt water my 2000 litres worth of display tanks would send me broke in 6 months. I might sound a bit jaded but it's just how i feel about salt water tanks, but please don't stop doing what you love because i will always need dead coral/live rock and coral sands for my tangs :)

For starters why would you go with halides when there's led units that far outway halides in every way (we are in 2016 not 2006) which are a hell of a lot cheaper to run than halides. 

Secondly your mate that can't keep corals alive for a long period of time is obviously doing something wrong which has rubbed off onto you about the marine hobby! Yes it takes more care to keep corals alive than just having a freshwater tank with fish and ornaments but the extra time caring for salt is well worth it in my opinion. The colours in a marine tank are absolutely awesome. My son stared at my last tank every night for ages. 

Dont be mislead by other people's experience with marine because it's generally bought upon by themselves 

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39 minutes ago, african-cichlids said:

If your going to cycle with base rock why add live rock after? Forget all the pretty hitchikers and what not and stick with your base rock! Your already doing the hard yards at the start by cycling with dry base rock so stick with that. If you want to seed the cycle get sand from matured tank or marine pure! Iv just finished cycling my second tank with just base rock and seeded it with one piece of live rock from matured tank. Age of aquariums has some awesome south sea base rock it's so porous

From what I have read and have asked on masa it's a good way to go, cycle the base rock, add live rock and have the live rock seed the base rock to create more live rock.

I could have misinterpreted it though.

It's been information over load the past few week researching all of this.

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Yes it is a way of seeding I agree 100% just make sure its from a matured tank tho. You don't need unwanted hitchikers, algae, Aptasia so just be mindful when getting it. I had a really bad experience with live rock in my first salt tank and let me tell you it was painfull

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10 hours ago, gene4567 said:

From what I have read and have asked on masa it's a good way to go, cycle the base rock, add live rock and have the live rock seed the base rock to create more live rock.

I could have misinterpreted it though.

It's been information over load the past few week researching all of this.

Masa, lol, good luck, lol.

 

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11 hours ago, african-cichlids said:

For starters why would you go with halides when there's led units that far outway halides in every way (we are in 2016 not 2006) which are a hell of a lot cheaper to run than halides. 

Secondly your mate that can't keep corals alive for a long period of time is obviously doing something wrong which has rubbed off onto you about the marine hobby! Yes it takes more care to keep corals alive than just having a freshwater tank with fish and ornaments but the extra time caring for salt is well worth it in my opinion. The colours in a marine tank are absolutely awesome. My son stared at my last tank every night for ages. 

Dont be mislead by other people's experience with marine because it's generally bought upon by themselves 

lol, I didn't see the halide bit!

The problem with resistance lighting like any bulbs/halides or even fluorescents is they have a very short life span, 4 to 8 months with either.

The halides and tubes are still glowing away nicely but they are of near no use to quality algae's which also includes the algae with in corals.

The colours in light are what makes all plant life survive, not ultra violet radiation from sunlight and with all resistance lighting, it actual harms all life.

 Corals make their own sunscreen to protect then selves from it, we copied it and all plants have inbuilt protection from the suns harmful rays. 

The colour wave lengths from resistance lighting weaken quite quickly, still glowing away but semi useless from around 4 to 8 months of use.

Light emitting diodes impurities that make their colours are still going strong if kept cool ten years or more down the track and do not cook your tank like halides and slightly from tubes as well.

Say, as examples only, if you buy a halide fitting for $200 and the bulbs each year for $80 each, after ten years that's a $1000, you buy a led fitting for $280, that's it for ten years or more!

You can now see why if you do not get into leds for fresh or salt, you are costing your self big bucks in the long term!

Leds were accidently invented in the 1920s, so they have been around for quite a while and even when in the early to mid 2000s when cree hit the big time with their "then" fantastic 3 watt xr-e diodes and wow, varied optics and not the old resin dome optics.

When I would say they make resistant lighting look stupid, as usual masa fought tooth and nail with me to defend what shops were still selling and they were stuck in the 90s, just like now. 

Oh and for years now there has been a large range of led fluorescent tubes as well that you chuck in ordinary fluorescent fittings, I have been using led tubes for over 5 years now as well as my powerful led fitting on the top tank, still the same tubes and still growing corals and much more, that's five years at 20 hours per day for four of mine 14 hours a day for the others, still going strong at growing sps and lps.

The inbuilt colours, as in wave lengths makes all plant life photosynthesis, you can actually grow plants and corals better under leds then in sunlight.

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I am on MASA, but my main source is actually the boys at Petcity, and then I love a sneaky visit to Marine Mates, and another store on the north side who also used to sponsor..... 

I love finding new things, and love live rock.  It is fun, yeah you can get bad things, but that is part of the fun.

I think the unexpected is part of the joy.... and learning so much more...  I am a marine NOOB but. 

Technology wise - marine have better toys I am afraid. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, gingerbeer said:

I am on MASA, but my main source is actually the boys at Petcity, and then I love a sneaky visit to Marine Mates, and another store on the north side who also used to sponsor..... 

I love finding new things, and love live rock.  It is fun, yeah you can get bad things, but that is part of the fun.

I think the unexpected is part of the joy.... and learning so much more...  I am a marine NOOB but. 

Technology wise - marine have better toys I am afraid. 

 

 

Give it another 20 to 30 years at this hobby with out just buying most everything and put on line over there your mistakes and ways you made work and things you try out and make a lot of your own aquarium needs and your wording from there will be quite different and the relationship towards you there will be maybe "not like now!"

Live rock and things like substrates are short term things with long term headaches, visit this thread in 5 or 6 years and see if you want use the same words, if you are still into marines that is.

Much of the tech side of things with marines is directed at boutique/small bio systems, cause live and base rock and in time all external large surface area small media begins to fail due to the choking up with its porous nature with in 6 months to 2 years weakening nitrate reduction and valuable bio sinks, then if you do not have any thing like reactors they become a must as with carbon dosing, etc, etc, so with tech gear, a part from a few more things related to tech with marines, most all are great for freshwater as well.

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