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Breeding Curviceps Problem

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Over the past 12 months or so I have had three breeding pairs of Laetacara curviceps form. Each time they have been put in a breeding tank with no other tankmates. They go through all the motions, cruise around together, clean a rock and lay eggs and begin tending the eggs. Then the night following the egg laying they destroy the eggs and the male rips the female to pieces, killing her.

It has been different males and females each time and different batches from different suppliers.

The breeding tank is a 70 litre tank, fairly heavily planted with sand substrate and some rocks for breeding sites.

Has anyone struck this sort of problem before and does anyone have any tips or solutions?

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A couple of things to try

Remove male after fertilisation to another tank and let female rear the fry

Remove the eggs and hatch them in another tank? ( but still seperate the parents because the male will still kill the female)

I use to breed aggressive americans (particularly texas) in colonies like africans, one male and four or more females to share the aggression, with heaps of hiding structure, remove the eggs after fertilisation, and the male would move on to the next female in waiting - thats if you want heeeeaps of fry  

But if you are breeding them to enjoy the experience, probably the best experiment would be to simply add dither fish to enhance the curviceps parental bond together

 

 

 

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I used to breed L dorsiger, closely related. Bred them in a 2 ft tank, rocks, plants, driftwood. But I added a few platys or guppies to the tank - they kept the pair entertained with protecting their eggs/fry. Once the little ones swam free, I moved half of them into a fry tank and left the other half with the parents.  Worked a few times for me... But if I'd do it again I'd use at leat a 4ft tank.

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Hi guys, thanks for the tips.

I was going to give curviceps breeding a miss but will give them one more go and add your tips to the mix.

As old age creeps up I am cutting back on the number of tanks I keep for breeding and grow out and have some other fish I am interested in, so if the curviceps don't play the game this time I will cut my losses and move on.

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There is a thin blue fiberglass mesh used by concrete render trades that has 6mm gaps. I use this as a tank divider on a frame as fish will spawn right through it. No need to remove it ever. Baby fish can pass through both sides to which ever parent that calls until they get too large.

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On 17/08/2019 at 2:45 PM, aquaholic99 said:

There is a thin blue fiberglass mesh used by concrete render trades that has 6mm gaps. I use this as a tank divider on a frame as fish will spawn right through it. No need to remove it ever. Baby fish can pass through both sides to which ever parent that calls until they get too large.

Thanks for the tip. This is one I have never thought of. I have some similar sized mesh tank dividers so will give it a go once the female recovers a bit more.

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It just depends on why you are breeding the fish.

If you are going for high output, just watch the fish behaviour, move interested pairs to a dedicated breeding tank then remove them after spawning and artificially hatch & raise eggs. The adult fish don't firm long lasting bonds in my opinion. I wouldn't keep a single pair together when not breeding.

Breeding through a net is a nice lazy way to raise fish semi naturally. I've had separated fish spawn through a canister filter (input and output at opposite ends of  tank - pretty clever fish! ) so the netting isn't any barrier to breeding. I use thin blue fiberglass mesh for cosmetic appearance, cost and durability.

 

Another lazy way to breed fish naturally is to rack all  your 3 and 4 foot tanks end out with open space at front end for feeding & cleaning and a high pile of rocks at the back for total privacy and security. The fish will still hang out at the front constantly for food but when they don't come out, expect babies. If you can face the back end towards the sun/window to promote a green algae wall, the fry will get first foods naturally without over feeding/water pollution. The distance away from you/front of tank gives the fish more confidence, epecially good for more aggressive species.

If you don't want to rack tanks end on, you can use java moss and a light. Just let the Java moss completely fill the tank. You will only see glimpses of fish occasionally but easy to scoop out babies as you need.

Good luck. It's impossible to reduce the number of tanks of you are breeding.

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