Jump to content
gtr73

Crushed Coral

Recommended Posts

i change my whole substrate from the gravel crap to calcium carbonate in one hit. didnt bother my fish. my fronnies more the CC around alll the time doesnt harm them. im guessing coral sand would be pretty similar.

Cheers

Matt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It can be a bit pricey if you want to use it as a substrait

When its cheeper to get 2 kgs put it in a stocking and put it in the bottam of ya canster filter

I got 2 kgs the other day cost 5$ and in 4 days the ph was up to 8 from 5

I only needed a kg in both filters

Andrew

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies everyone. :D

I'm now thinking I'll put a bag of crushed coral or calcium carbonate in my canisters.

I read on another forum that a bag of crushed coral in a filter actually reduces in size over time. So it must dissolve slowly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's no need for it.

The pH of CC is somewhere between 7.8 - 8.2 (there are a couple of different kinds).

If your tanks water and/or the water you're using for water changes is a lower pH, the CC will desolve, and bring your pH, KH and GH up. It sounds good at first but it is a "pH swing" (words that no hobbiest or fish wants to hear). It would be better to pre mix your water to the right chemistry before adding it.

If your tanks water and the water you're using for water changes is the same pH or higher than the CC, it wont desolve unless the pH drops - a pH swing. To remedy: remove whats making the pH drop. Likely suspects are wood and CO2 (use an air stone).

...And its expensive. There are other, cheaper sands/gravels, that are just as white.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's no need for it.

The pH of CC is somewhere between 7.8 - 8.2 (there are a couple of different kinds).

If your tanks water and/or the water you're using for water changes is a lower pH, the CC will desolve, and bring your pH, KH and GH up. It sounds good at first but it is a "pH swing" (words that no hobbiest or fish wants to hear). It would be better to pre mix your water to the right chemistry before adding it.

If your tanks water and the water you're using for water changes is the same pH or higher than the CC, it wont desolve unless the pH drops - a pH swing. To remedy: remove whats making the pH drop. Likely suspects are wood and CO2 (use an air stone).

...And its expensive. There are other, cheaper sands/gravels, that are just as white.

Thanks, this is the info I'm after.

I've been manually adding Baking Soda and Epsom Salts with water changes for a while, so my PH is kept at, or just over 8.0. I'll have to check again what the general hardness was, but last I checked it was in the very hard water bracket.

However this is why I'm looking at adding a permanent buffer, to take away that bit of work (and risk) outta water changes.

Do you think it could present a big risk to my tanks if I go adding a bag of crushed coral in my canisters? I plan to do it with 50% water changes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you do add it, you dont need to do a water change cause it wont change the tanks chemistry.

Yeah, water changes can be a pain. One of the best, if not THE best way to do water changes, is to use a BIG bucket, drum or container to mix the buffers and salts into the water, heat and airate it, then pump it into the system. It doesn't cost much to set up, the fish will love you for it, and on larger tanks/systems it will save you heeps of labour.

Link to comment
Share on other sites



×
×
  • Create New...