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Columnaris is caused by the Bacterium called Flavobacterium Columnare and presents as fin and tail rot.

Nifurpirinol or antibiotics can cure it if detected early enough. Death occurs due to Necrosis of the gills which is hard to detect without an Autopsy. Cheers Graeme.

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Ryan you might want to sort this out this is the second time you've had sick/dying p bass in your tanks :notsure: and the causes of disease may lead you to the problem ie. "overcrowding, rough handling and poor water quality with high toxins"

Dave

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Yer I did research that's how I found this diseas I had this real strong stuff that supposible kills good and bad bacteria and was looking for tri sulphur because article said that is best but got recomended other stuff even better. Anyway it's on my barras an leichardie. I'd say bad handling I move the fish 3times in a day 1st because were fighting 2nd water change took them out and rock fell through net so caught them with a broken net which his head was half pushed through 3rd putting them back in tank

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hey mate. im not having a go or anything but maybe type your messages into microsoft word or similier and run spell check for proper punctuation. not having a go just i find it very hard to read your posts which i find beneficial.

good luck with healing your peacock bass back to health

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Yer I did research that's how I found this diseas I had this real strong stuff that supposible kills good and bad bacteria and was looking for tri sulphur because article said that is best but got recomended other stuff even better. Anyway it's on my barras an leichardie. I'd say bad handling I move the fish 3times in a day 1st because were fighting 2nd water change took them out and rock fell through net so caught them with a broken net which his head was half pushed through 3rd putting them back in tank

All i'm saying is get your water right before you go treating the symptoms because when the toxins build up in the water again the disease will return :boggle:

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Taken from:- http://freshaquarium.about.com/cs/disea ... mnaris.htm

Often mistaken for a fungal infection because of its mold-like lesions, Columnaris is a common bacterial infection in cultured fish, particularly livebearing fish and catfish. Its name is derived from columnar shaped bacteria, which are present in virtually all aquarium environments.

The bacteria are most likely to infect fish that have been stressed by such conditions as poor water quality, inadequate diet, or handling and shipping. Columnaris can enter the fish through the gills, mouth, or via small wounds on the skin. The disease is highly contagious and may be spread through contaminated nets, specimen containers, and even food.

Columnaris can be external or internal and may follow a chronic or acute course. Lesions in chronic cases progress slowly, taking many days before culminating in fish death. In acute cases the lesions spread quickly, often wiping out entire populations of fish within hours. High water temperatures accelerate the progression of the disease; however lowering the water temp will not affect the outcome of the disease.

Anyway it's on my barras an leichardie. I'd say bad handling I move the fish 3times in a day 1st because were fighting 2nd water change took them out and rock fell through net so caught them with a broken net which his head was half pushed through 3rd putting them back in tank

I take it you advised all the people that you have sold fish to lately????

viewtopic.php?f=11&t=29243

Your Bass

viewtopic.php?f=18&t=29468&p=170080#p170080

Peps and Orange Spots

viewtopic.php?f=10&t=29374

Peps

viewtopic.php?f=10&t=29350

1 sleepy cod around 25cm floats around $25

2 synodontis poker dot catfish 15cm $40 for both

2feather fins 15cm $40 for both

1silver perch 20cm $20

1 kingseizei 7-10cm $7

Have you heard of the term QUARANTINE

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flex is easy to treat in most fish MOST of the time.

but there are some really nasty strains out there, that move FAST.

I usually reccomend getting the temp down to the low end of what your fish will tolerate.

If they are ok at 24degC then start there.

This slows down the bacteria spread.

Then look at ammonia and nitrite.

Then look for rotting food.

flex is a composting bacteria

it needs to be in high numbers in the water and the fish to be stressed/injured to be a threat to healthy fish tissue.

If it grows on the fishes gills it will usually kill them.

When you have seen the gills after this happens once, you will be able to recognise it forever.

surprisingly flex is weak to lots of things

but dont overdo the meds!!!

too much acriflavin will kill a fish just as quickly as flex will!!!

If you have a microscope, be sure to take a look at a scrape of it.

try spot the 'columns'

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