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Opinions on co2 injection kits?

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Recently I've been thinking about starting a heavily planted tank, and have seen/heard that co2 injection kits enhance plant growth. Was just wondering if anyone has experience with these and could tell me a little more about them. There is a lot of information about them on the net but not many personal opinions on them. Are the kits expensive? also how long does a bottle of co2 last? Is it expensive to fill back up? If anyone could tell me a little bit more about them that would be great. Cheers :)

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Recently I've been thinking about starting a heavily planted tank, and have seen/heard that co2 injection kits enhance plant growth. Was just wondering if anyone has experience with these and could tell me a little more about them. There is a lot of information about them on the net but not many personal opinions on them. Are the kits expensive? also how long does a bottle of co2 last? Is it expensive to fill back up? If anyone could tell me a little bit more about them that would be great. Cheers :)

IMO CO2 kits are definitely essential if you want to achieve a planted tank to the extent in which you see in the magazines. They definitely drastically improve plant growth. The kits are expensive: co2 cannister, regulator, selanoid (optional) etc.... So you will be looking at paying anywhere between $200 and $600 depending what size cannister you get and if you can get any cheap 2nd hand gear. How long it lasts depends on your size tank and the size of the cannister you use and obviously the rate in which you use your co2 but usually they will last a long time provided you get the appropriate size cannister for your tank. For example I have a 2.3 kg cannister I run on a two foot tank and I use co2 at about 1 bps (bubble per second) and that lasts me about 1 year. I fill my bottle up at the home brew place in underwood and to fill my 2.3 kg cannister it costs me $25.

HTHs, ask away if you have anymore questions.

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IMO CO2 kits are definitely essential if you want to achieve a planted tank to the extent in which you see in the magazines. They definitely drastically improve plant growth. The kits are expensive: co2 cannister, regulator, selanoid (optional) etc.... So you will be looking at paying anywhere between $200 and $600 depending what size cannister you get and if you can get any cheap 2nd hand gear. How long it lasts depends on your size tank and the size of the cannister you use and obviously the rate in which you use your co2 but usually they will last a long time provided you get the appropriate size cannister for your tank. For example I have a 2.3 kg cannister I run on a two foot tank and I use co2 at about 1 bps (bubble per second) and that lasts me about 1 year. I fill my bottle up at the home brew place in underwood and to fill my 2.3 kg cannister it costs me $25.

That information is fantastic. cheers. It will be for a 6 foot tank. so Im probably better to invest in a large bottle. Where can you buy this sort of equipment from? also can you run more than one diffuser off one setup? Im thinking of putting a few in there... Also, does having that many plants reduce the cleaning that you need to do of the gravel? Ive always wondered how often the professionals have to mess up their grass and moss with the gravel siphon...

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That's a big tank Zane! big tank = alot of maintenance and trimming! Are you that commited?

I bought my co2 cannister from Brew by U and the rest you can get online (i'll PM you). You can run as many diffusers as you want from one setup.

Generally when you have a planted tank you never siphon your gravel as there is no need. I have never ever siphoned my tank.

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Yeah,

6ft is a big tank, but maintenence depends on the plants you choose. I have a 5x2x2 with aquamedic cylinder, solenoid and reg, and the 2.6kg cylinder is only 1/4 used after around 3 months, its running at around 4-5bps, it gets hard to count at that rate :ewink:. With a tank like that you will also need a more efficient diffuser than the glass/ceramic diffusers. I use a cheap one from g***ys, and it works fairly well.

The other thing i would be considering is lighting. For alot of the foreground plants (HC, UG, glosso) you need alot of light, like 3wpg.

Cheers,

Rusty

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Yeah,

The other thing i would be considering is lighting. For alot of the foreground plants (HC, UG, glosso) you need alot of light, like 3wpg.

Cheers,

Rusty

the wpg rule is very over rated imo ..the general rule has been around for over 10+ years and has seem to stick in the minds of hobbyest..

the simple fact is there have been major advancements in lighting technology and research and the wpg is now towards the bottom of the light choice spectrum.. although still a factor..

the things you should be looking for in Aquarium lighting are:Lumens per watt,Lumen focus (beware of restrike), PAR and then watts ....

this in turn can change the style of unit you buy to house the globes you choose...

dont just purchase lights based on wpl as there is quite alot involved in lighting a heavily planted tank..

i would suggest you research lighting heavily before buying co2 units..as plants can grow with light alone and co2 is not always needed....

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another point to add is:

start with a small tank 2-3ft and try ur hand at DIY co2 injection using the yeast/sugar method and see you can get some success..

this will give you a basic understanding of methods used and also an insight into the fundamentals of the c02 process..

this set up can cost you under $50 and would greatly beneficial to your future plans...

setting up a 6ft planted and everything going to sht can ne quite frustrating a very costly..

HTH...as i am currently going through this my self

Luke

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I try and get my set ups as close to 30Lumens per square inch of fish-tank surface area.

so, with a 6ft x 2ft tank, that is 72x24 = 1728 square inches, x30 lumens, meaning 51840 total lumens.

I am not personally familiar with 6ft fluoro lamps. I know that a 5ft globe can pump out about 5000 lumens on its own. So you would need about 10 bulbs. Which would fit easily across the top of a 2ft wide tank.

I assume a 6ft standard light bulb would probably have 1/5th extra lumens, so about 5800-6000lumens, meaning you'd probably only need 8 or 9 globes for the best lighting you would ever need.

The above sort of lighting is generally considered to be enough to grow any and all plants. Beware, with the above lighting, CO2 and ferts in the tank, if you don't have enough plants in the tank then Algae will very soon start to grow.

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The tank is 6ftx15'x18'. Working out lighting is going to be harder than i thought. Currently it has a 6 foot twin tube light. one white and one blue, but Ill get 2 new white globes for it. Is there a special kind of tube that I could thats better for plant growth? across of the tank I could probably fit 2 more of those twin light setups. So it would be 6 bulbs altogether. Would that be enough? I might even try to go with 5 white globes and 1 blue one, so I can still get the moonlight effect when I want to. Im a bartender at the moment and my boss thinks that Ill be able to get one of those big C02 cylinders cheap off the supplier. So now all I need is to get it filled and the solenoid and regulator. Im looking at this setup at the moment - http://www.greenleafaquariums.com/co2-r ... lator.html . Will that do the job well? Cheers for all the advice so far :).

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Yeah, wpg is a bit dated but it is the easiest way to explain lighting needs.

Sylvania Grolux are really good t8 tubes for plant growth. If your looking at getting new lights, i'd look into some t5 units. These days they cost around the same amount as the old t8 setups. If your serious you can even buy a single unit that houses 6 or 8 sets of lights, although these are a bit more expensive.

Cheers,

Rusty

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Guppies Aquarium Supplies Online sell CO2 Kits that are simple and easy to use. They are on page 2 of their on sale items and from memory are only $10-15 and you can get replacement canisters 4 for $10. Much less messing around than the yeast setups.

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http://www.aquascapedesign.com.au/ ....... that is vital website for anyone looking at getting into the planted tank hobby. Speak to Adam that owns that website through email or over the phone. He welcomes anyone who is willing to get into the aquascaping hobby. His items on there are great quality, and yes they might not be the cheapest, but the quality far outweighs the cheap stuff getting around on other internet shops. I just bought over 800 bucks of stuff from him, all of which is QUALITY products, and is the most helpful guy I have ever had to deal with.

I just noticed this thread. There is a few things I would love to point out. For a real heavily planted tank like you suggested you are going to do, you will need a few good things;

Substrate; Substrate is the key for all plants. It all starts off with good substrate. If you have a normal substrate, it is vital to now start placing dino dung, plant fert tabs, etc etc under the substrate layer to help boost it's nutrients. Alot of stem plants draw nutrients majority of the time from the substrate, with little from the water, therefore making a good quality substrate important. A UpAqua would be my best bet. You cannot stuff this up like ADA and is far easier and has less of a spike with initial placement in a tank when water is added. ADA is a harder substrate to use initially. These types of substrates are nutrient riched with iron, and all the trace elements vital for plant growth to reach maximum.

Lighting; Should have adequate lighting source. T5 High Output would be your best bet. Metal Halide and LED are fantastic too but for heavily planted tanks, you cannot go past T5 HO lights. Later on when LED technology becomes more advanced, I do believe LED will be the path to follow, but at the present time T5 HO offer great lighting source, with enough coverage from front of tank to back of tank without a loss in intensity, which is often present in Metal Halide.

Liquid Fertilisers; A good amount of liquid fertilisers is important. Such things as Potassium, Iron, Trace Elements are all important to be added to the tank. Best to add during the day however.

c02; A good diffuser is important, otherwise c02 will be wasted and not utilised efficiently. c02 is important in a planted tank and provides great nutrients. c02 should be supplied through the day, with an aerator on during the night time. This helps the photosynthesis of the plants. Placement of the diffuser must be within an area of great flow to utilise the circulation of the c02. That is why on many planted tanks, Lillypipes are put at one end of the tank at the back and the c02 diffuser at the other end at the back to create maximum efficiency of the c02 in the tank.

Filtration flow; A good natural flow is often recommended according to Takashi Amano but that is for really heavily planted tanks so unsure how planted you are discussing. That is why lillypipes are often used.

Although this is the case, it depends by what you meant heavily planted and the range of plants you are going to keep. Some help with the range of plants you are going to keep might be great so we can assist further.

IMO there is no point wasting time on high lighting, c02, liquid fertilisers especially if the plants you are growing are root based plants which draw most of the nutrients from the substrate. Therefore substrate does play a vital role.

Hope this helps, I am happy to help you with any tank questions :)

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