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The mods will move it to the right section, ( thanks ) Has anyone kept an octopus? I am concerned about it escaping through a standard set of lids, so how did they avoid this, so on and so forth. I am thinking of a smallish breed, maybe blue ringed or the like. Anyone?

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when i was working at a previous aquarium i kept a small sandy coloured one for a month at or so before it died, no idea why. it was only around the size of a tennis ball when not spread out.

I had lots of books on top a very tight fitting lid, the tank had heaps and heaps of live rock in it which i re-arranged every few days.

fed him on chromis,crabs,shrimp, cardinals ect. got heaps of food from the live rock when they came into work (living stuff would be left in the bags when you took the live rock out)

replaced 100% of the water with freshwater from work twice a week.

it was cool, but a bit to much maintence for me to want to keep one again, and i sure as hell wouldn't want to be bitten by a blue ringed as they are can kill people. maybe try a different cephalopod?

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thanks Frinkazoid, sounds like too much work. whats this i hear about canoodling in the cinema? As you you matt, it just so happens in the tipping comp at work I am third.........last

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I new a bloke who kept a blue ringed O/Pussy it ended up escaping on him through a 5mm gap...i guess the best idea would be to use one piece lids that are thick and heavy. Just thoughts anyway...

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no worries tony

whats this i hear about canoodling in the cinema?

if that was aimed at me i have no idea what your talking about......... unless it was on monday, but canoodling was kept to a minimum :soppy:

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I used to have a pair of blue rings in an open topped 2' aquarium (about 15 years ago) - they never tried to escape. I stumbled on to them at Wynnum one day about five meters away from each other and less than ten meters from a group of kids playing. I threw them into a bucket planning to walk them well away from people and release them, but to my astonishment the male put on a colour display and jumped the female within about a minute of her being put in the bucket (I don't think she saw it coming...). After that display I was keen to see more.

They need plenty of things to keep them interested, furnishings and live food go down well. They were relatively shy. They maintained separate burrows and gardens and their behavior was absolutely fascinating. When I put food in the male would grab it, sneak over to the females burrow and try to lure her out - sometimes holding it with an extended tentacle, sometimes depositing it and backing away to a safe distance to watch. To my knowledge he never got lucky again (I don't think she forgave him for the bucket incident). I had them for most of a year until a carpet anemone decided to relocate to the filter intake while I was away one weekend, turning the whole setup to putrid soup...

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I used to have a pair of blue rings in an open topped 2' aquarium (about 15 years ago) - they never tried to escape. I stumbled on to them at Wynnum one day about five meters away from each other and less than ten meters from a group of kids playing. I threw them into a bucket planning to walk them well away from people and release them, but to my astonishment the male put on a colour display and jumped the female within about a minute of her being put in the bucket (I don't think she saw it coming...). After that display I was keen to see more.

They need plenty of things to keep them interested, furnishings and live food go down well. They were relatively shy. They maintained separate burrows and gardens and their behavior was absolutely fascinating. When I put food in the male would grab it, sneak over to the females burrow and try to lure her out - sometimes holding it with an extended tentacle, sometimes depositing it and backing away to a safe distance to watch. To my knowledge he never got lucky again (I don't think she forgave him for the bucket incident). I had them for most of a year until a carpet anemone decided to relocate to the filter intake while I was away one weekend, turning the whole setup to putrid soup...

WOW! Makes me want to keep one (or 2) now! It's awesome the stories that people have to share, thanks for sharing it :) I'm sorry to hear about losing them though, would have sucked big time :(

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yea they are easy as.

1st rule of keeping an octopus, forget everything you think you already know about keeping octopus.

2nd rule of keeping an octopus, cycle and mature the tank first. Then get 1 octopus. More than 1 equals drama until you have experience.

3rd rule of keeping an octopus, set up a tank to keep feeders in. I started with shrimp, now I feed redclaw cray.

4th rule of keeping an octopus, if in doubt read up on the http://www.tonmo.com website

5th rule of keeping an octopus, keep it well fed so it doesnt try to escape to go hunting.... but keep it hungry so it comes out to beg for food. lol this is the one tricky bit!

6th rule of keeping an octopus, as uber cool as they are, its not worth dying to keep one. Leave blue rings to others.

7th rule of keeping an octopus, dont keep it with fish you like

8th rule of keeping an octopus, anything that eats algae with be eaten by the octopus. Therefor become at one with the algae and GROW macro algae.

9th rule of keeping an octopus, it will hide a lot at first. Be patient.

10th rule of keeping an octopus, the best thing about keeping an octopus IS TELLING PEOPLE YOU HAVE AN OCTOPUS!

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Thanks for posting DeadFishFloating. While I was reminiscing I had no intention of promoting the keeping of blue-rings as pets and should have put more thought in to how it might be taken - at the time I was working in marine sciences at uni, had had plenty of experience with keeping cephalopods, had ready access to live foods, and worked with people who'd kept and bred blue rings before. Definitely not for the novice. As much fun as the octopi were, the school of pygmy squid I also had weren't prone to escaping, didn't make me nervous about water changes, and absolutely rocked in their hunting and courtship behaviours.

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lol

thats alright I wasnt having a go bro!

just worries me when theres no anti-venom and people still want them.

risky

they are a lot of fun to breed, although heart breaking to lose the mums

and ya you cant give away the fry mostly

anyway something different and I love mine

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Very interesting! Have been wondering the same..

Have a second tank was thinking of something a bit unusual & different - like squid out of the creek or an octopus. Not sure how hard it would be & what water requirements? If could transfer the squid over to fresh slowly? Ive never done saltwater.. so bit unsure.

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I have kept an Octopus but after 3 years he went exploring my lounge room and did not survive .

Of the Cephalopods I like cuttle fish . I had 2 for a while (caught locally at Redclife ) but one day the more dominant one ate it's tankmate.

I found Cephalopods to be a lot of bother long term , as they are sensitive to temperature change ( even slight ) nitrogen compounds and only eat live food .

That said kids love watching them .

It is easier for me to keep them than most people as I am less than a Kilometre from where they live and I can go and grab some water to do weekly waterchanges etc.

I am now pretty much over keeping any marine organisms - but I like to see others giving it a shot .

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Species unknown but it went from a 15 mm bub to a tad over metre across the tentacles .

In the wild these particular ones Spawn and die at 2 years anything over that is borrowed time .

Any of the marine animals I have kept are all local from reefs or rock pools in the bay .

I am long over marines now - Protein skimmers drilled tanks sumps trickle filters fluidized bed filters and halide lights all just way too much when you have to work for a living .

Fresh water only now and basic easy to keep Tanganyikan Cichlids .

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