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zane

Keeping parents with fry?

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Hey guys and gals,

I have a 2ft kribensis tank with 1 pair and about 100 fry from their last batch. The fry are about 1cm long now. The parents get along fine with the fry but they are showing signs that they might spawn again soon. Should I remove the adults or the fry? Or just leave them be? I dont want them to eat their fry in defence of their new eggs thats all.

Opinions appreciated :)

Cheers

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Hey zane,

Personally i'd probably take the fry away especially if the parents look like breeding,

Alternatively you could move the male to another tank because they won't spawn again until he's reintroduced to the tank and that may stop the fry being eaten.

HTH

Cav

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Hi Zane,

Here is just a "bit" ;) of info off the net for you, enjoy your read.

P.S Have Krib fry myself and all are doing real well.

I feed them baby brine shrimp and removed the parents after 2 weeks of them hatching.

Breeding: Type: Egglayer. Difficulty: Very Easy.

Kribensis (Kribs) are pair forming cichlids. Once a pair has been established, they will breed readily. All they need is a cave-like structure to breed in. Kribs are hidden brooders and will not breed out in the open like some larger cichlids. Overturn plant pots, driftwood, rock structures, coconut shells and even PVC pipe make good hiding places for breeding. When using dry coconut shells (or half shells), clean it thoroughly and make a small entry hole, about 1 ½ to 2 inches, for the fish to enter. When creating a stacked rock structure, make certain that it is sturdy and will not collapse on your fish. You can use aquarium silicon to glue them together. The water's pH does seem to play a critical role when breeding. An alkaline pH seems to produce predominately male offspring, while an acid pH produces predominately females. Neutral water produces a more balanced sex ratio.

The female is usually first to initiate courtship. She will pair off with the strongest available male in the group. The female will show off her bright red belly to the male and often curl and vibrate her body in front of him. By swimming upside-down, the female will deposit from between 50 to 300 eggs on the inner roof of the nest (though this is not always the case). Kribensis are good parents. The female guards the eggs and young while the male defends the territory. They become extremely aggressive at this time and will even attack fish larger than themselves. If you notice that your other fish are restricted to a corner in the tank, that's a good sign that your Kribensis are spawning. It is important to have other fish in the tank for the parents to chase (know as dither fish or target fish), otherwise the Kribs may take out their aggression on each other. Good dither fish are fast swimmers such barbs and tetras. Rosy Barbs make good dither fish since they are usually too fast for the Kribs to catch.

The eggs hatch between 3 to 8 days. The parent may move the fry to different locations by caring them in their mouths. The fry are free swimming in about 5 to 10 days. Once fry are free swimming, they can be fed finely crush flakes, and newly hatch brine shrimp. If the tank is mature, there should be enough organic matter for the fry to eat. The parents also assist in feeding the young by spitting food to the fry. The parents will gather the fry into a school and lead them on excursions around the tank. Sometimes one parent may want to take sole care of the fry and will attack the other parent to keep it away. If this happens you should separate one of them before they kill or injure each other. If possible, do not remove the fry from the tank until the parents are ready to breed again. Removing the fry too early may result in domestic violence if the male is ready for some loving and the female is not. Courtship

A thanks for the info would be appreciated.;)

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Thanks for the fantastic information sej66 and __CAV__! So I guess my next question is would it be better to move the parents to a separate tank or the fry? This is the most successful krib spawn Ive had so Im really trying to get it right. I dont want to shock the fry by moving them to a bigger tank with different water conditions?

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Your very welcome.

I removed the fry into another established tank (2x1x1) for now and moved the mother back into the community tank where she came from originally.

Unfortunately I lost the father. Mine are Albino Kribs.

So if you know of anyone on here who has a male Albino Krib 4 sale, please let me know.

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Ohok cool. How big are your fry now?

Send Herby1 a pm. I got my male krib from him and Im pretty sure he can get albino kribs as well. He's in Ormeau :)

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