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Brengun

Red Sea Max 250

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Picked up my first ever marine tank yesterday. Its an all in one red sea max 250.

Tank and stand $2,200 plus $50 for the lfs guy to assemble the cabinet which with all the filters and stuff took him a few hours and a Hailea chiller for $404.

I won't be putting anything in it for a couple of weeks as I am just going to let it sit in its spot and see if its not in the way.

I also have to make sure I could service the filters and stuff from there and if its going to be reasonably dry around the cabinet as I do tend to splash a bit of water about at times.

Also pretty broke after initial purchase and haven't even bought salt yet so this will be a long term setup.

Besides, how often do you get to set up a marine tank? Might as well sit back and take my time.

I also have some books to read before I get started like The Reef Aquarium Vol3 so I have some sort of idea of what I am doing when I set it up.

The Marine Tardis.

IMG_3026.jpg

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surely seawater would "go off" unless it was coctntly filtered...?

theres alot of small organsims in seawater that would die and I'd assume the water would foul up pretty quick...

happy to be corrected on this of course...

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Yeah there is a way of sterilizing and storing it but I will just do the plain old salt mix. If I can find floor space for a wc drum for salt I will premix and heat and filter it as well.

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depends on the organic load in naturally collected seawater..... I usually use it in first week, or after at least 4 weeks IF it had lots of stuff in it.

I have in the past used chlorine to burn off organics and then dechlorinated it heavily, then used it. But thats taking things to EXTREMES.

Looks good Brengun. They are a decent setup... although when I am leaning inside one.... I always get the feeling the lid is going to close and I am going to be eaten up pacman style.

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I haven't even seen the filters and stuff in the back yet. I need a good sized box to stand on lol.

No wonder there are more men fishkeepers than women, its cause the men have longer arms and can see and reach into tall tanks.

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collecting sea water from the ocean can be a risky business. alot of the time it depends heavily on where you collect it from, what time (ie high tide or low tide), recent rainfall and so on. also consider what fish u are going to be keeping. obviously collecting sea water would be fine if u collected fish out of the same area as the water u intend on using, but if the fish come from the barrier reef for example the water could be very different. also when using natural sea water there is no real way of knowing what exacty u are putting in ur tank and if it will be enough to sustain whatever organism u are looking at housing your system ie calcium/magnesium ratio's for sustained coral growth. not saying it wouldn't work or be beneficially, just not as controlled as mixing ur own.

using cl- neutralisers in saltwater can cause over skimming and wetbubbles in ur protein skimmer a seperate container of premixed salt with simply a powerhead turning over the water for a week or so before hand will ensure cl- disipates and the salt is properly mixed and won't fluctuate. R.O. water is obviously the best for mixing but not exactly cheap. the brand of salt u are thinking of using will also have a large bearing on your success

marine systems are endless fun.

enjoy.

Edited by Lennox

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The tardis has now been relocated to the other side of that post where two waterchange drums were and the drums are in the front now.

I have discovered the lid must have the front flap folded back before opening as the full three stage lid if swung back hits the ceiling.

With that bit folded back, it hit the post behind it as the top of the post bulges out toward the tank. When I pulled the tank away from the post a bit I lost a lot of the walkway room so the tank had to move.

Funny thing is, now I moved the tank to the other side of the post, there is tons of walkway room and the tank looks like it was made for that spot.

The wc drums because of their round shape side either side of the post so plenty of walkway room there as well. It actually works out better as the floor slopes away from the wc drums to the doorway behind other tanks so my marine stand shouldn't cop too much in the way of wet feet.

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I tested my wc drum of pure rainwater for phosphates using the salifert kit. I wanted the really accurate test so I did the double amount test and halved the results. I couldn't really even say the reading was up to the first 0.03 part. It wasn't glassy clear but it was only faintly cloudy. I am guessing my test to be around 0.01 when halved. I must have good quality rainwater.

My tanks are only a few years old and special poly tanks, with all poly fittings. We clean the seives into the tanks quite regularly. Its amazing what leaves and stuff comes off the roof to the seive.

In dryer weather with less frequent downpours I think I will retest the water but for now I think its safe to use without a RO system.

The hose from the tap to my food grade wc drum is also non toxic food grade hose (very important that as a normal garden hose will eventually leech a petroleum film into the water.)

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Tanks got water in it yay! It also has 54kg of Carib Sea Arag - Alive Saltwater Bahamas Oolite. I have got liverock but waaaaayyyy more than I am going to need. I went in to buy 25kg and ended up with 50kg. *Never weigh liverock on carpet base*.

Fortunately the lfs told me to keep alive what I dont use and I can return it after the new year break.

The only things I have running are the two powerheads and the hood fans. The tank sits under a fluro light already but I will have to figure out the timer on the hood lighting. On the to-do list.

Also have to figure out the skimmer and tweak it to run properly and work out how to set the temp on the chiller. There is a heater installed but I doubt I need turn it on with our current weather.

I will get a photo when I am finished fiddling and rearranging the liverock, which could be a while as I have very little idea of what I am doing lol.

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Last night I started adding the live rock to the tank. OMG I didnt have a clue about how to stack it and it took me hours with a completely wet shirt when I had finished.

I have gotten better than 40kg in I think but I dont know if I want that much in there or not but it will be a pure coral tank with next to zero fish (maybe some little anemone shrimp or something).

Any ideas or suggestions? Have I have messed it up or not?

Right side to the back. Did I leave enough clearance for flow around the back area?

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Did I leave enough power head room do you think?

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Pretty chuffed I have one bit of wildlife in there. :) Is it a good snail? It seems to be eating the funny mosaic of stuff on the glass.

IMG_3262.jpg

Be gentle if you think I need to take half that liverock out and rearrange things.

It took a lot of woman hours to get it in there. Just pray we never have an earthquake lol.

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Yea I dunno if those snails eat coral...... see them on liverock quite often.

You sure have a lot of flat liverock pieces!

Looks like it will create some great shelves to put coral on (gonna putty it in place?)

You have also created a lot of nooks and crannies that small fish would enjoy

I suppose it depends on the types of corals you plan to keep

Your setup would work well for morphs.

But for corals that need more light you may find the ones lower down are shaded by those above.

I usually work off the theory of getting as little rock as possible in base contact with the substrate. And as much exposed to water flow as possible.

Hard to give much advice as I cant really see the rockwork in its entirety

but I probably remove about a 1/4 of it

keeping the more unusual shapes.

but then setting up the rocks in a reef tank

it usually takes me a few days

lol

and its pretty personal thing to do.

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ya looks better with those pictures.

One thing I would try do is get larger ledges to overhang. You have a more even wall going.

Tricky with all the flat bits and wanting to keep it all stable.

Trying to get more of the rounder rocks between the flat ones may help create more ledges using less rock.

remember the real estate at the top will be a priority for higher light corals so try to keep as much of it free as possible

I'd also remove the white dead coral as it sorta looks like you have already lost one. Kinda like having empty clam shells in a tank you are keeping a live clam in.

the cave over the big cowrie shell looks great, would be awesome to see more like it.

theres no real right way to stack rocks and if you are happy with it

thats all that matters!

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It seems to be a tricky thing, in the quest to get height, you end up losing a lot of good flat surfaces with more rock on top. Apparently some rearrange their rock for years so I wont be cementing them.

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Ok, done a bit more aquascaping with the liverock, much to my skimmers disgust as it was just starting to settle down and work properly.

I took several pieces out as there just seemed to be too many flat bits in it.

Hope you like. :)

IMG_3313.jpg

IMG_3317.jpg

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out-f-standing

srsly thats well done

1) you used the golden rule to get main display area at 1/3 zone

2) main display area has lots of light available, perfect for the best coral

3) min surface area touching substrate, max surface area in water flow (check!)

4) looks stable

5) no dead zone at the back

me likey

as to cementing..... I meant putty on the corals once you find a place they are happy in

but ya congrats

good work

hard to imagine it covered in corals

but it looks good to me

so, I hope you are happy with it too

:)

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Wow, must been pure accident lol. I do have a dead spot along the back in the middle.

Doesnt seem to matter which way I put the rockwork or how I place the powerheads it doesnt seem to move sooo I have ordered the little wavemaker Vortech Propellor Pump MP10WES.

Its only to 50gal and my tank technically without rocks and stuff is 66gal but someone else I heard got the bigger MP40 and he cant use half of the different wave settings as its too strong for the tank.

Thats the whole idea, to have some fun and get waves happenin.

Have you seen the one on youtube? Saved it to my favorites cause its so much fun.

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7th Jan, 2011. Exercised the womens perogative of mind changing and rearranged the live rock ... again. :D

Although the power head on the left (looking from the front) is well powered, the one on the right (running through the chiller) is mild to say the least.

The stronger power head also has the annoying habit of hitting the front wall at what ever angle I set it and is digging holes in the sand at the front and kicking it all over the rocks behind it.

With a Vortech mp10 wave maker (which I have now ordered) in mind I thought I would give the rocks a bit of a wiggle to check stability and it was pretty poor.

Spent the next couple of hours rearranging and it feels "almost" earthquake proof now. :)

From this:

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To this:

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