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Tank upgrading advice

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We are going to be upgrading our 4ft display tank to a 6x2x2 :D:D (my biggest tank yet). In a month or so, as soon as we get everything together. I am basically planning everything now. I like to know what I have to do before I do it. It also gives me time to change my mind, which I can do, and often do, being a women :lol: (ask Carl he'll back me up)

I tough part is the new tank has to go where the old tank is. This gives me the problem of setting up a new tank without the chance to age it. All of the gravel, driftwood, plants etc will be moved over to the new tank. I will have to put the fish into the new tank straight up too.

Just a few questions:

Should I wash all the old gravel out before going over to the new tank? It will be mixed with new gravel.

I am hoping to fill the tank from the hose. I don't like the idea of carrying 600lt of water from a tap to the tank. Will this affect the gravel too much? Would I be better off filling the tank, treating it, the adding the old gravel? Maybe I could bring in the 200lt drum fill it, treat it and pump it over, it will just take a while (sorry thinking out loud).

Is there anything extra I should add to help with the stress on the fish?

Filtration:

Should I just connect the old canister up to the new tank along with the new OR put the old filter material into the new canister and just run it?

Should I add some extra aged filtration to be on the safe side? I do have some spare large sponge filters available (aged of course).

Would I be better off adding *something* (can't remember the name) to stop the ammonia spiking?

On the side of filtration what to people think:

One large canister filter OR two smaller canister filters OR something else?

Don't really want to run a sump, as it's in the lounge in an open front stand.

I will leave at that for now, I am sure I will think of more later.

Thanks

Jenny

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G'day,

You could use some Seachem Stability in addition to the gravel, filters and water from the old tank. I've set up a completely new tank using Stability and had fish in it the next day and I just dosed and fed lightly for a week and no fatalities :D

Good luck

Damo

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G'day Jenny,

Should I wash all the old gravel out before going over to the new tank? It will be mixed with new gravel.

Yes, wash both sets of gravel untill the water runs clean and you don't have anymore detritus.

I am hoping to fill the tank from the hose. I don't like the idea of carrying 600lt of water from a tap to the tank. Will this affect the gravel too much? Would I be better off filling the tank, treating it, the adding the old gravel? Maybe I could bring in the 200lt drum fill it, treat it and pump it over, it will just take a while (sorry thinking out loud).

Fill the tank with gravel, place a wide, shallow bowl on the gravel, and fill the tank from the hose, directing the water flow into the bowl. The water will spill over the sides of the bowl, without stirring up the gravel much.

If you are adding plants, driftwood or rockwork, only fill the tank about 20cm. Then plant all your plants, arrange your driftwood, or build up your rock work. Then finish filling your tank.

Once your tank is full add a double dose of Seachem's Prime. Read the instructions on the bottle, and also remember to add in the volume of your filters to the the total water volume of your tank.

Now setup your filters to the tank.

Filtration:

Should I just connect the old canister up to the new tank along with the new OR put the old filter material into the new canister and just run it?

I would definately setup the new tank with both canister filters, the old and the new. I don't know what type of canister filters you have, but I run two eheim 2228's and a 1800L/P/H trickle filter on my 6 footer.

The old filter has established bacteria for breaking down amonia and nitrates in it's filter media, and this will pretty much negate the need to cycle the tank from scratch. The old filter will help seed the new filter.

I would lightly feed your fish over the next two weeks.

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A 300w Jager will do that tank easily

They are rated upto 1000l and I find them the most reliable

If you have a 200ltr drum there why dont U fill that with some of the water from your 4ft and then use it again when U fill up the 6ft

This will help your fish as its not a complete water change then

I agree run both canisters for awhile and if possible all the time

Also feed lightly for a couple of weeks

Id use Prime and Stability

When I set my 6ft up at home I used 250 ml in 3 doses and ths was set up from scratch everything new and I had fish within a few days without any problems

Brad

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Just from my experience from changing/starting new tanks . . . .

"Should I wash all the old gravel out before going over to the new tank? It will be mixed with new gravel."

Nope. You want to transfer any of the "nutrients" the nitrogen cycles needs to keep going in the new and bigger environment. If adding new gravel all the more important you don't clean out too much of what's in the old gravel.

"I am hoping to fill the tank from the hose. I don't like the idea of carrying 600lt of water from a tap to the tank. Will this affect the gravel too much? Would I be better off filling the tank, treating it, the adding the old gravel? "

No, you'll will have to do it the hard way, maybe use the 200ltr as you suggested. Any chloromines may harm beneficial bacteria coating the gravel 'cause it lives in the gravel too. Most lives in you filter because of the constant water flow but to start your new tank you need to "seed" as much as you can from the smaller old tank.

"Is there anything extra I should add to help with the stress on the fish?"

I would transfer most of the water from the old tank into the new. Also the water conditioner should hopefully have a stress coat, so that'll help keep them calm and happy.

"Filtration:

Should I just connect the old canister up to the new tank along with the new OR put the old filter material into the new canister and just run it?"

"Should I add some extra aged filtration to be on the safe side? I do have some spare large sponge filters available (aged of course). "

I'd hook up the old canister fully preserved from the old tank and maximise the amount of beneficial bacteria. As mentioned, most of your beneficial bacterial lives in your filters.

I would also add the used sponges into your new canister and they will kickstart the bacteria colonies in it. The more you can preserve and keep going or help start more quickly from the old tank, the less you have to worry about in the new tank.

"On the side of filtration what to people think:

One large canister filter OR two smaller canister filters OR something else?

Don't really want to run a sump, as it's in the lounge in an open front stand."

Really depends on how many fish you plan to keep and how big the fishload is going to be but I'd use two cansiters as a minimum myself - your old canister filter as is, and the new one. Some people start using sumps so they can keep heaps of fish in there. So as long as you don't plan to keep thousands of fish in there, two canister would probably suffice.

Also don't throw in new fish immediately. I'd let the tank settle for at least a week or two then introduce new additions afterwards.

As long as you make the effort to move across most of the old tank into the new. It really isn't going to be too stressful in getting it started.

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Once fish have been put in there whower id use seachems "stressaid" i think its called, provides a slimecoat on the fish and does keep them very calm and not stressed.I use it when i move house a few times, works a treat.

Seachem stuff is awesome, and a big range.

Dave

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if your going to use a hose i would suggest not using garden hose as the hise itslef can leach hazardous chemicals into the water , i would invest in some non toxic drinking water hose, its not too expensive- like $1 or 2 a metre and then your safe...

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Just thought I would add my thoughts.

As a tank is a closed system there is a balance that occurs within the tank. The bug colony grows big enough to contend with the amount of poop your fish can poop.

When you add more fish - thebug colony needs to grow to account for the increased poop.

This is regardless of the amount of water. You have the perfect number of bugs currently in your tank.

In your new tank the challenge is to get the most bugs you can over to the new system, without killing them.

(Ok I am kinda simplifying and ignoring the age of the bugs question too)

With this in mind I would:

Get my fish out of the old tank and keep all the water. This water I am going to use in the new tank to keep conditions as stable as possible.

Whatever the old water goes in - hook up my old filter to it. If you leave a filter turned off - the bugs die - and I think it is only takes a couple of hours to kill the bugs.

Now I have time to mess around moving things and plugging them in.

Any new filteration will just give more water movement initially.

I would treat with prime and monitor my ammonia, nitrate and nitrite to see all is well over the next week.

In terms of the gravel - you have a trade off between keeping bugs alive and all the crap that was burried coming out. If I was perfect with my gravel cleaning I wouldn't worry about cleaning the gravel. Knowing I am not I would have to clean my gravel of the stuff lurking at the bottom to avoid a ammonia spike.

HTH

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