Jump to content
Grumundi

What camera?

Recommended Posts

Ok... I know I asked before then went broke.... LOL

Anyway, I have about $700 to spend on a decent camera, I also have a $150 credit with a US freight forwarder, so best if its out of the states... what should I get, this is what I have been looking at, would like to take some Macro images aswell and Video.

eBay - New & used electronics, cars, apparel, collectibles, sporting goods & more at low prices

However I have no idea what lenses will do what?

Let me know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd go for body only Grum and save up for either a macro lens or extension tubes but it'd bust your budget.

The kit lenses are aimed at general photography but if you wanted to specialise, then body only and then choose prime lenses when you've got the money. The kit lenses can be used with the extension tubes, but they'd never produce top notch images. The other cheaper alternative is magnifying filters, although nowadays, the kenko extension tubes are almost as cheap as a good filter. With that limited budget the kit lens would be a start and then for macro, possibly a 50mm 1.8 (cheap but sharp) with extension tube for the macro.

The IS lens on your link though, has been improved on, to a later model ll

I buy all my gear here Canon :: Digital SLR Cameras - eGlobaL Digital Cameras Online Store The freight costs but it's normally here quicker than it would be from Sydney and it's insured.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok so the lense is not that great, but will get me started right?

Is the body of the machine good? or what would you recommend for those $$$.......

I'm really flying blind here, would like a general ok machine, which I can upgrade later to do the more specialised stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, it won't take the hammer of a pro or semi pro machine. It's also small, so if you've got big mitts, it can be a bugger to use. Go 2nd hand 40D, or 70D and lenses later. It'll get you started yes, but if you get a real interest, you'll be kicking yourself that you didn't buy into the tougher stuff at the start. yopu have to decide if you want amateur results of long term pro/semi pro use. But as it is, it's a good bit of kit if you don't hammer it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You know what, Canon isn't the only brand out there. I shoot Nikon but I am not biased towards Nikon. Canon are cheaper than Nikon which draws in the money but when you look at the same spec camera's side by side, you notice Canon has shortcuts.

Anyway, to get you started with a D-SLR (If that's what you really want) you will be best going with the higher end kit lenses.

Nikon- 18mm-105mm zoom with a telephoto zoom of 55mm-300mm or 70mm-300mm.

Canon-18mm-135mm zoom with a telephoto zoom of 55mm-250mm or 70mm-300mm.

After a while you may want a prime lens (Fixed focal length, beast image quality and large aperture). A 35mm or 50mm prime lens will be a must have.

If you want to do Macro work. Tamron 90mm Macro or Tokina 100mm Macro lenses. Very cheap lenses but with very good optical performance.

If I had to sell all my lenses and only have 3, they would be:

Nikon- 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6G AF-S VR II (Zoom).

Nikon- Nikkor 105mm f/2.8G AF-S IF-ED VR Micro (Macro).

Sigma- 50mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM (Prime).

Edited by 175Myles
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also forgot to mention, 10 Mega-pixels is perfectly fine for every day shooting and will give you reasonably large prints if you ever find a picture that you just must have on your wall.

If you ask around, a few people will tell you they don't shoot in full resolution unless they are after that wall photo, otherwise it just takes up memory on your computer.

High resolution is great for photo editing for portrait work and other high light area's, but as soon as it starts getting dark you will have to rely on flash or you will get unattractive pictures ruined by High ISO noise. Point and shoot camera's suffer from High noise very badly as they have crammed a shit load of pixels into a micro sized sensor, meaning when you take photo's in low light without flash, its just coloured grain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I got it, haven't really played around with it alot, 10 minutes and taken a few photos, I really just wanted it to take product photos for my new business, but its good, auto seems to work well, automatically flips up the flash if it needs it, so for me thats easy. Few random photos with it for you

.post-1-14711625277697_thumb.jpg

post-1-14711625277533_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites



×
×
  • Create New...