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kilo1

Water changes and chlorine

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I was doing some water changes and some one dropped in to buy some more fish,I said how they going the last lot you got off me and he said yeh ok ,lost a few after I water change...Id like a dollar for every time I've heard that and this is a simple mistake to make and I bet everybody has done it and accounts for a major amount of unexplained fish loses.

Any way sat down and intergrigateted him with the usual questions

When doing a water change and you are adding tap water to a tank YOU have to treat the water for the whole tank not what you are putting in all the molecule stuff rebind back with the old water and become chlorine again or whatever again.

But if you have water in a drum treated you just treat for that amount and then ad into tank.

Feel free to ad on here if I'm wrong.........as if I had to ask lol.

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Really? I have to admit I only add Prime to the new water I am putting in. I put my new water in from the kitchen mixer tap using 9L watering cans (mixed with warm water to take the chill off). So I only add Prime to the new water in the cans then add that to the tank. So each watering can is treated with Prime before adding to the tank. Have been doing that for 18 months now and never lost a fish either. So I am interested in the thoughts here.

I would have thought if your current water in the tank is chlorine free and you add new water pre-treated with Prime before adding to the tank, then it would all be chlorine free? Or does it not work that way???????

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if your adding prime to the water can then that water to tank all is fine.

its when you ad water to the tank then treat with prime or whatever ,then you have to treat the tank as if you are just setting it up.

chlorine will probally be dispersed if there is enough water surface agitation over time but slowly

chloramine will be something that probally will build up over a period of time.

i really dont know cause ive had no probs because if i even add 20l to a 6ft tank i treat for 300l and have done for ever.

i think i remember that adding a cup of water to 10l of declorinated water was enough to recharge it,as i said said not real sure on this but chlorine neutrealioser is cheap.

Edited by kilo1
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can you over dechlorinate? might sound silly but do the chemicals become toxic in an excessive amount?

not that i plan on adding a bottle each water change im just curious lol

dont know probally ...but i can tell you some chlor neuts have a very short useby

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The chlorine neutralizer part is safe for fish at any concentration as it is only sodium thiosulphate.

Where they become toxic to fish is the other chemicals included in them like the heavy metal removers.

A 5 x dose is accepted as safe but over that things could start to go wrong.

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can you over dechlorinate? might sound silly but do the chemicals become toxic in an excessive amount?

not that i plan on adding a bottle each water change im just curious lol

Prime says you can safely add 5x amount.

Dropping the water, adding prime to tank for whole volume then filling up does use ALOT more Prime.

But heck, it saves me precious precious time which is worth its weight in gold.

Edited by kasman
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Which is why I use Prime.................no sell by date.

All chlorine neutralizer's can go off as sodium thiosulphate has a relative short shelf life once turned from crystal form to a liquid.

You can test the chlorine neutralizer by mixing a weak solution of condies crystals with water and adding some chlorine neutralizer to it.

If its still active it will turn the condies a yellowish color.

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If you're using tap water, don't dump it straight into the tank. Dose your dechlorinator straight into the bucket or whatever you use to get the water from the tap to the tank.

If you have to dump tap water straight into your tank (from or a hose or something), dose for the entire capacity of the tank, not just the water added.

That's the way i've always understood it, and it makes sense to me.

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If you're using tap water, don't dump it straight into the tank. Dose your dechlorinator straight into the bucket or whatever you use to get the water from the tap to the tank.

If you have to dump tap water straight into your tank (from or a hose or something), dose for the entire capacity of the tank, not just the water added.

That's the way i've always understood it, and it makes sense to me.

yep same here

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Filling straight into your tank is perfectly safe. Dosing for the complete volume is a must though. The reason for this is Chlorine and Chloramines are not the only thing that Prime will bond to on a molecular level. There are many chemicals,minerals, dissolved organics etc in our tanks that prime will actually bond to long enough for our biological filtration to take care of. The problem this makes for in tank water changes is when you dose for the amount of water you are replacing only, much of the Prime can be used up bonding to these leaving a lower concentration of the Prime to do its job with the Chlorine/Chloramines. Seachem have this info on their sites and also state on their bottles to dose for the complete volume if treating in tank. For those treating in a tub prior to introducing it to the tank, treating for the replaced amount is fine. If you are going to age your water first, no prime is needed if your water has Chlorine only as this will evaporate off fairly quickly with a little aeration or water movement. However, if your water has Chloramines in it you will still need to dose. Chloramine is used now in most municipal water supplies because it doesn't evaporate off like straight Chlorine.

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All chlorine neutralizer's can go off as sodium thiosulphate has a relative short shelf life once turned from crystal form to a liquid.

You can test the chlorine neutralizer by mixing a weak solution of condies crystals with water and adding some chlorine neutralizer to it.

If its still active it will turn the condies a yellowish color.

Seachem state specifically (at their website) that prime had indefinite life.

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wow virtual high five to kilo1 for posting this!

I've just put the hose in the tank and turned it on, then put in some prime and left it to fill up - never had any problems, but that being said I do tend to do about 4x the amount i really need to, which is probs why i havn't run into any chlorine related problems (aside from me just forgetting to put it in all together).

But good info to know guys!

oh and I was also under the impression that prime lasted forever - or at least until you finish the bottle.

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Filling straight into your tank is perfectly safe. Dosing for the complete volume is a must though. The reason for this is Chlorine and Chloramines are not the only thing that Prime will bond to on a molecular level. There are many chemicals,minerals, dissolved organics etc in our tanks that prime will actually bond to long enough for our biological filtration to take care of. The problem this makes for in tank water changes is when you dose for the amount of water you are replacing only, much of the Prime can be used up bonding to these leaving a lower concentration of the Prime to do its job with the Chlorine/Chloramines. Seachem have this info on their sites and also state on their bottles to dose for the complete volume if treating in tank. For those treating in a tub prior to introducing it to the tank, treating for the replaced amount is fine. If you are going to age your water first, no prime is needed if your water has Chlorine only as this will evaporate off fairly quickly with a little aeration or water movement. However, if your water has Chloramines in it you will still need to dose. Chloramine is used now in most municipal water supplies because it doesn't evaporate off like straight Chlorine.

Ok,mate well written that's what I wanted to say ,so from now on I'll come up with the subject title and you fill in the rest ,lol

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