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I bought a large peice of driftwood from an auction a few months back. After I was the winning bid and it was delivered, I noticed it really wasn't driftwood at all. It has burn marks all over it!!!

I have since tryed to clean it up a bit by cut away carcoal, sanded, filing etc

How detremental would it be to fish with carcoal on it? I have soaked it for 2 weeks now and water still goes Black. I will keep soaking it but should I add bleach to the soaking tank next time to help remove carcoal before re soaking it clean water again and again.

Any info would be helpful

AC

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think about iy all carbon is, is burnt coconut shells. I would have soaked in a chlorie mix and then soak in clear water. and it should be fine. Driftwood is not driftwood these days but hardwood soaked and treated.

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think about iy all carbon is, is burnt coconut shells. I would have soaked in a chlorie mix and then soak in clear water. and it should be fine. Driftwood is not driftwood these days but hardwood soaked and treated.

Hey,

Braddo, not sure where you got your info on carbon, but it isn't burnt coconut shells? Diamonds aren't burnt coconut shells? There are also 3 different types of carbon... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon

How much charcoal is on your wood? It may be that you need shave some of it back if it is excessive. Having slight charring of the wood is generally ok, as long as it doesn't look like a bit of partially burnt wood you'd pull out of a fire remains - that is no good and if it was to be used would take a fair bit of work.

If your piece of wood is size enough to fit, the best option would be to boil the wood, and keep doing so until all of the tannins and natural dyes have depleted - you will see all sorts of oils, black dyes, tea coloured dyes coming out. Changing the water between boils will help remove these impurities. Keep doing so until the water is pretty much clear - or even a very slight tea colour after being boiled... This can take some time and patience!

We had a piece of wood that took 4 days worth of boiling and prep work before it could be added.

Once you put it in your tank, get yourself some Seachem Purigen as this will help to remove any remaining tannins that may tint your water. This stuff works a treat but only after you've made a good attempt at prepping the wood...

IMO I probably wouldn't use a bleach or chlorine to prep the wood, this is only potentially going to mask what is already infused in the woods core and eventually will leach tannins anyways. Boiling it reduces tannins etc to oil or a liquid form and allows it to draw away from the wood.

Good luck!

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Mate the carbon used in the hobby is in fact burnt coconut shells then compressed into the pellet form. The reason cause it is cheap to produce. Not being rude but wikipedia only tells half of what is known never trusted it never will. I got my information from an importer of this product that has seen it manufactured. As for chlorine will actually remove rthetannins by destroying them. All wood will still leak tannins even when boiled or chlorinated as unless treated under high pressure it will never get rid of the centre wood tannins. remember chlorine dissipates after a period oftime due to it turn into a gas.

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At a guess I would say if it is staining the water black ( as opposed to brown - which is tannins ) it is most likely ash in the wood and charcoal .

I would give it a squirt with a pressure cleaner then soak it for a while in bleach or chlorine changing the water every few days 'till it comes clear !

Then soak it for a week in plain water if it stays clear it should be fine . I have logs with burns on them and they have been fine for years .

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Mate the carbon used in the hobby is in fact burnt coconut shells then compressed into the pellet form.

Hey Braddo,

Yes some filter media carbon is produced by coconut shells. It is also produced with brown coal and wood depending on the grade and price. This is activated using steam prepartion for ash removal and enhances the porous surface.

Slightly different to charcoal that may be found on a burnt log - different prep, different properties.

Certainly an interesting topic on the production of this - sorry didn't mean to question your knowledge, just the way in which the post was written could be taken a couple of different ways.

I'm not overly a fan of Wiki either, but backed with alot of other articles on the web, it does ring true to some degree.

AC - There are alot of pros and cons on bleach use in the aquarium, some swear by it, some totally disagree. Certainly alot of read ups on a google search of 'preparing driftwood for aquarium use'. This should help you make an informed decision by others experience and examples. Some tragedies have also occured where as bleach has leached out of the wood resulting in some fish deaths where it has been prepped incorrectly.

Cheers!

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Personally I would not use standard bleaches as they do have other additives one of the reasons why I use pool chorine it is 100% chlorine no additives. Plus chlorine nuetralisers will remove any of itthat may be left. excuse the typing am doing it left handed

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