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liquidg

Marine aquarium club in Brisbane-reef life collecting.

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Another month or so has past since the last thread to promote our Brisbane marine aquarium club and as usual we have had some wonderful low tide walks and free dive collection trips for our marine aquarium pets.

The aandtsociety.org.au has had some top adventures over the years with in the clubs organised field trips and has been doing these fields trips for both freshwater species and reef life since 1927 from when the club was first formed.

As most know we are only marine/reef keepers these days, though a few of us keep fresh water as well and over recent years the trips have become totally directed at enjoying the marine diversity that is achieved by the rare convergence of both tropical and temperate marine life forms here allowing us to get our own, sometimes a little unique marine life for the hobby of reef keeping.

This is a little more of what we do on organised club trips.

The south east sites we go to normally have some friendly stone fish to greet us on trips.

stone-fish-.jpg

One of the many varied zoanthids seen and collected,some of the guys like to keep them in the display tanks.

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This year will be called a year of copper bands-chelmon rostratus, they seem to be everywhere from this breeding season.

Of course the global warming temps these days around the south east are contributing to the enormity of marine aquarium life over recent years,unlike the past

copper-bands-.jpg

From low tide rock pool club trips and some times at free dive trips, there are always heaps of lawn mower blennies-istiblennius meleagris around to choose that particular one or three for the tank to help with clean up, they are good workers!

lawn-mower-blennie-.jpg

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Literally millions of yellow claw clean up crew hermits at a particular spot,at the rock pools.

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One of us collecting some clean up crew.

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A vigilant club member did well at finding a ball of chaetomorpha algae up the coast on a low tide club trip, some members have it in our nutrient importing areas expanding nicely now.

The last season and this one has proliferated the coast with black lion fish-pterois volitans, they are everywhere!

Two of the club members have predator tanks, so we got some for them.

voiltan-.jpg

Edited by liquidg

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A mantis seen on one of the open ocean trips, cocky little guy this one!

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The next trip two of the club members were interested in keeping one or two so a peacock mantis was spotted, as usual, and after some careful collection,lol and some loud clicking,lol,it went home with us.

You have to be careful of a sizable mantis like this, they are a small creature, but can cause some nasty harm being the most efficient killer on the planet!

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There are some areas up the coast where we find some nice morphs,two of the guys love these as tank additions.

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The last season dispersed millions of blue tangs in the south east, they have nearly been found everywhere we go to!

blue-tangs-.jpg

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Some nice anemones we see and some of the guys collect some for their aquarium, to me they are more so a pest in the tank, amphiprions do not need them in a display tank.

anemone-2-.jpg

A nasty looking little guy this one,part of the scorpion family,it can give you a painful sting as a lion fish can,not fatal,unless you are susceptible to marine Neuro toxins,then the pterois antennatta can be fatal as well.

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Many box fish around as usual, we all have at least one in the reef tanks.

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This pearl scale mimic, this one is not quite as common this season as the heraldi and the flavissimus mimics, but still a welcome site, a good catch and new tank addition for one of the club members, a top fish in a reef or standard marine aquarium.

I have had mine for nearly a year now from the last season, the third one over the last 30 years.

vrolki-mimick-.jpg

Edited by liquidg

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How does one house a mantis Shrimp, I though they had the ability to smash tanks and such?

acrylic tanks are reccomended

but if you are up for the risk, glass can be used too.

acryilic - Google Search

There are rumours of stomatopods breaking aquarium glass, but this likely only occurs when large stomatopods are burrowing in shallow substrate or when they are housed in tanks that are too small for their adult size; it is therefore recommended that they be kept in acrylic tanks to avoid the possibility of breakage.

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How does one house a mantis Shrimp, I though they had the ability to smash tanks and such?

One of the club members has a serious marine breeding program between him and two marine biologists, plus they keep several mantis and he keeps them in acrylic tanks, the problem is they scratch the hell out of them, so that wouldn’t be a good idea as a display tank for them.

If you just want to keep them as pets somewhere, use tubs.

It takes a very large mantis to break glass; the ones on average you will sadly find from your live rock are no where near big enough.

This thread link from one of our collecting adventure has one big enough in it to take out a tank with around 6 mil glass easily.

Local large mantis shrimp videos and information.

They are near on the most interesting creature in the sea, second only to species of anemones that has an internal life span.

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love the box fish lol theyre adorable :)

We all have a least one each out of us and they are doing very well.

They are quite suseptable to white spot and fungus,both of those issues are impossible in my system though.

The one in the tub has turned grey to blend in there and the one in the reef tank is full on yellow with its black dots and both have been trained to eat anything the others eat.

The last page i think it is on my jornal has a pic of the dice box in it.

http://southeastqueenslandm.aforumfree.com/t884-my-first-glass-aquarium-in-two-years

Edited by liquidg

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Nice pics as usual Lg!

A guy on another forum I look at has quite a number of mantis and he has no dramas with glass. He is not interested in fish only mantis and has just brought a pretty big setup to house them all I would love to share a link so you could see them. Its a very interesting read his pics and videos of them are amazing. You can here the thump when it smashes a live fish! He has a small reef with corals just for 1 mantis!

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I don't blame him, they are fascinating creatures, I used to keep them a long time ago,a blue one, the normal peacock green and the washed out crème coloured ones.

I tried the one foot mantis collected to try and get it to break glass, but it didn’t work.

So far I have only ever seen one species with only club and not spike,the two common ones here have both, so much info on the net is incorrect, even one of the guys that said the info was correct when he saw that the mantis caught for him had hammer and spike was very surprised.

Some thing else about them, they are quite tasty you know, like a slightly tough lobster, tastier than prawns, a mate used to be a prawn trawler owner and he caught and sold the monster ones as a by catch, good money as well, some of those from the bay were the size of your arm.

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I don't blame him, they are fascinating creatures, I used to keep them a long time ago,a blue one, the normal peacock green and the washed out crème coloured ones.

I tried the one foot mantis collected to try and get it to break glass, but it didn’t work.

So far I have only ever seen one species with only club and not spike,the two common ones here have both, so much info on the net is incorrect, even one of the guys that said the info was correct when he saw that the mantis caught for him had hammer and spike was very surprised.

Some thing else about them, they are quite tasty you know, like a slightly tough lobster, tastier than prawns, a mate used to be a prawn trawler owner and he caught and sold the monster ones as a by catch, good money as well, some of those from the bay were the size of your arm.

Found his youtube channel so now I dont have to link the other site.... there is alot more videos too.

Morgoth Kills Curious Cardinal Instantly! - YouTube

Zuzu the Unique - YouTube

and his sig of all he keeps...

STOMATOPODS

Gonodactylus smithii (Adam) - Male - 25mm - Nov 13th 2011 - Alive

Gonodactylus smithii (Eve) - Female - 60mm - Nov 13th 2011 - Alive

Lysiosquillina sulcata (Morgoth) - Male - 150mm - Dec 3rd 2011 - Alive

Gonodactylaceus graphurus (Rocky) - Male - 50mm - Dec 11th 2011 - Alive

Gonodactylaceus graphurus (Minnie) - Female - 60mm - Dec 30th 2011 - Alive

Gonodactylaceus graphurus (Maximus) - Male - 90mm - Dec 30th 2011 - Alive

Gonodactylaceus falcatus (Shockwave) - ??? - 60mm - Jan 5th 2012 - Alive

Lysiosquillina maculata (Leviathan) - Male - 275mm - Jan 16th 2012 - Alive

Unknown / Mutant Species (Zuzu) - Male - 50mm - Jan 20th 2012 - Alive (Unique

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Wow looks like you guys get some great stuff. Awesome pics, would love to come out with you guys one day haha :P

I have only collected for me, two fish for the display tank in the last few months,in the tubes i am trying some lysmata redline to breed and get a few raised later on, I did it many years back, all other fish are for members that want something but don’t have the ability to catch it yet.

I use tubes for my experimenting, so far an endemic dotty found only on the sun shine coast I caught a while back, the info available on them is wrong, they think the varied colours in the ones found are different examples, they are not, just different stages of growth until changes of sex,from pink to black, the last one took one and a half years to morph, I take it out and take a pic once a month to show its changes, it lives in the first tub with my school of blue tangs,chaeto trays and other fish.

The second tub has a club members chaetodons caught for him being conditioned for tank life,7 varieties at this stage for him and others to train them by example,cujivoe used in the right ways inspires all life to eat virtually anything they would not normally try, they are all pigging out on basic foods now, including a new one normally hard to feed, a fingered dragonet.

The wet section that runs my conditioning and experimenting tubs removes any types of stress and eradicates white spot, that’s what the collecting is to me these days,good fun,excercise and helping other club members

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Liquid have you tried keeping any of the threefin species?

The black cheeks are very stunning even compared to dragonettes.

Although I dont know if they are found this far north?

picture is a random googled one of m/f pair

Threefin%25252C%252520Black-Cheeked%252520and%252520Common%25252001.JPG

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Our pres had a couple caught for him of the enneapterygius ruffopileus,the endemic ones to our east coast, I can’t have them, the last one was killed by the blennies I have, but they are very common here and quite easy to get comfortable in the aquarium, his both looked exactly the same, from several trips back but with two, they are both males, there is always one with the striking red colouration as a territorial type of thing, he has a tank to condition new life first before going into the display tank as well,as every one should have.

Nice fish,but better colour from them when there is two as long as they can get away from each other.

Very hard to catch and find, well sought of,when you haven’t caught one before.

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I used to watch the males do courtship dances when snorkling in rockpools as a kid. One of my favourite fish. I actually bought my first chiller to keep the local macroalgae species alive, so I could recreate their biotype.

Got a few spawns but never raised fry.

As long as they are kings of the mature tank, they be super easy.

Certainly helped me with my surplus brineshrimp problem!

:D

I found once you stopped moving and actually looked

they are a common species.

Not unusual to see a territorial male every 2 or so metres.

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Your lucky you could buy a chiller,they didn't exist to be affordable back then for me,my first one i had to make it myself and yes the fish are common, when you have seen them before and a very fast little fish with short bursts.

An easy one to keep and a good fish for a reef tank,if you don't have the black headed, similar to peacock blennies i have,they kill other small fish and if not fed well,kill both lysmata peps and redline when they shed.

An unidentified species of blenny so far and i cant get them out, oh well they may harm some life forms,but they also eat cyano,so by eating any that turn up in my tank,they are not all bad I suppose.

A similar to peacock blennie in shape,with a gold body,pitch black head with silver bars all the way along it and a very fancy fant opal coloured tail,no hump on head or raised dorsel of any kind,i have never seen them before and have not since.

I have sent off pics,no luck,next time the states to see if they know of it.

Out of all the blenny types i have in there,they are very cute and unusual colours,but very nasty to some things.

That leaves the little dragonets out for me.

see yah.

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I had to wait a looooooooooooooong time to be able to afford my first chiller. But it all seemed so very high tech back then. I put together the ultimate reef tank. DEEP SIX hydrometer, QUEEN protein skimmer, 4 tube T8 lighting and even KENT suppliments. I believe I still have my journal for the tank somewhere.

Some amazing macro algaes out there tho, I think marine planted tanks have a long long way to go!

Blennys are something I have usually restricted myself to only having one of. Have you been done by a fangtooth when collecting before?

Such a tiny fish, but bloody hell they can give a good nip!

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