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drmunroe

What is the tap water pH level in your area?...

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Just wanted to do a bit of a poll i guess - wondering what the variation of pH from tap water in different areas.

I live in mudgeeraba & my tap water pH seems to be coming out around 7.7 / 7.9 (i cant be certain cause im colour blind). Good for africans, not so good for my tropicals... :(

Which leads to the following question - recommendations on a good pH buffer? or are they all about the same...

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Im about 7.4 here thought overnight its 7.2 to 7.0

For ya tropicals I would use Seachem Neutral Reg

Will buffer your tank to 7.

Plus it has a water conditioner built in

Brad

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Generally 7.5-8 and you can smell the chlorine a mile away..that's why i run all my water through carbon filters and into holding tanks

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It would be very unusual for tap water to be below 7.5

Water authorities try to ensure water is Alkaline to reduce corrosion to their infrastructure

I personally don't like adding chemicals to water.....Most species will live happily in treated tap water in a cycled tank

and those that don't.....do a lot better in soft water.....not hard water with chemicals added to make it more acid or less alkaline

I do add rainwater,and use natural acidifying via peat and ketapang leaves to breed certain species....but most of these fish are not found in your LFS.

The industry makes a lot of money selling chemicals to people so they can play with their water chemistry without really understanding what they are doing.....it often ends in disaster. I'm not trying to say I know what I'm doing....just the opposite....I know I'm not a chemist!

but I have worked out what works for me with minimum risk.

I'd hate to think of what it has cost me to work this one out.....hahaha.... ;)

Not looking for a fight....but happy to debate

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Sunshine Coast, at least the Southern areas supplied by Baroon Pocket Dam are pH 7.1, 4dgH, 4dkH - beautiful for Americans straight from the tap :)

Until this changes, due to the already low Carbonate Hardness, I'll continue to simply add Prime and pre-heat/age it in drums. Have a 5000G water tank with outlets near tanks and drums but would rather not mess around with bi-carb etc. until necessary.

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i'd forget chemical buffers thier only short term and are really only there to make money. ph will be at its highest before the lights are turned off at the end of the day, the more plants/phyto plankton in the tank the greater the rise will be but outside from 7 to 9.5 in one day in sunlight with lots of plants or algae is not unusual as ph changes due to the amount of co2 dissolved in the water. for permiant higher ph use limestone gravel or possibly crushed coral but i dont wana know were they get that from. lower ph heaps of driftwood and yes peat but usually trying to raise ph so havent really done so myself.

hope theres a bit of info in there

cheers

mick

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measured it last night ... 7.5 @ taigum/zillmere

i use lake malawi buffer for my african tank & take it to arounf 8.0-8.4

my planted tank & main display tank have driftwood that pulls the pH low to around 7.0

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forgot to add i also use seachems malawi/victoria buffer great stuff and keeps my tank at 7.8ph with out dropping or adding more until the next water change

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I used to make up a 10% solution eg. 20ml acid to 200 ml water. You then just add the acid solution to your water change barrel as required. Just add a bit at a time and test your PH until you reach your desired level. It will only take a couple of times and you will get to know how much to use. It is heaps cheaper than ph down. It is at bunnings in the concrete section. Be careful not to spill it on your skin as it burns. Don't open the bottle to close to your face is the fumes really get up you nose.

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No does not harm the fish at all. Most people also use it in swimming pools to keep the Ph at desired level (between 7.2 and 7.6). I use it in my pool.

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Don't add it straight to your tank.

What most of us use for water changes are large barrels or tubs, which will fill from the tap, add any aging/toxin removers such as Seachem Prime and any buffers or chemistry altering products such as Hydrochloric acid in this case, and turn it over with a cheap internal (or I do anyway), as well as heating it to the temperature of the tank it's going into (really is a must have for winter when tap water drops to around 18c).

You'll also need a pump to get it from a barrel to a tank, unless you're keen on buckets.

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What i basically do is i have 2x 500litre tanks that i bought from Bunnings for $70 each

When i fill them i run the water through a carbon filter and add 40ml of pool acid(Hydrochloric)

Before using the water on water changes i always check to see if the Ph has remained stable

it has usually had over a week to settle and age...and to be honest i have never had a water quality issue whilst using this method ;)

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