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Hi all

I was moving a pair of adult bristlenose out of my Calvus tank on the weekend & had a few little surprises. The bristlenose log that I was going to move with the bristlenose had a number of baby calvus in it & a heap of eggs that had not hatched yet. I removed the babies that fell out of the log when I moved it.

My question is, what should I do regarding the rest of the fry that have just hatched or are about to hatch in the bristlenose log. Should I leave them in there for a while & let the parents look after them or should they be moved out as soon as they are free swimming. Also I'm feeding the seperated fry a combination of microworms & baby brine. Is there anything else suitable to add to the diet that is easy enough to obtain.

Cheers

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Id move them out asap and then feed them baby brine or liquid food. Having never bred calvus im not 100% sure but thats what i would be doing. Just make sure the new tanks conditions are identical to the current tank.

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Micro worm culture would be good. Fry powder or liquid, live brine as mentioned. Live food works best. Whether it is because they need something to stimulate feeding or they are just lazy when young.

I would take them out of the tank, the parents{father especially} will eat them once they venture from the log anyway.

My current ones, breed in a barnacle shell & pottery shell. I remove the shell just before the young are going to leave the shell. Easy to tell in a barnacle shell but.

Once the fry are out & about in the fry tank, the shell goes back in with the parents.

I have had some females in the past that tend to only breed in one thing. I have had others that aren't so fussy. :roll:

Here is a good article. Another tip, is be careful with water changes with the fry.

Frenchy :D

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That will work. The other thing I feed thing when the fry are slightly bigger is frozen cyclops, its bigger than brine shrimp.

More useful reading,

Breeding:

Altolamprologus calvus isn't hard to breed, but you do need to make sure your fish are sexually mature and have the right place to lay eggs. While they are growing, you can keep

You can sex Altolamprologus calvus by size. Males are about one-third larger than females. I suggest starting with four to five fry or juvenile fish and growing them up in a twenty-gallon tank.

After two years or 2.5" for the female, pair formation will begin. Look for a small fish and large fish that like to stay together. At this point, it's a good idea to remove the other fish, although I have had successful spawns with unpaired calvus in the tank. If you have any plecos in the tank, it would be a good idea to remove them as they may eat the eggs.

Altolamprologus calvus likes to spawn in tight confines. In one of Pam Chin's columns, she recommended using shells. However, GCCA members who has successfully spawned this fish recommend Boester Bells named after Rick and Monica Boester who have sold many of these for breeding dwarf bristlenose plecos. These tapered, ceramic cones seem to appeal to the fish and worked for great for me.

The female will enter the Boester Bell and lay the eggs. The male, if he's not too big, will enter the mouth or stay near the entrance and wash his milt over the eggs. Young pairs will lay about 75 eggs. Larger pairs will lay over 200 eggs.

The female will stay inside fanning the eggs and protecting them while the male patrols outside. They are very good parents.

It's certainly possible to raise the fry in the parent tank, but I removed the Boester Bell one week post-hatch when the fry were are almost free swimming to a five gallon grow-out tank containing gravel and a seasoned sponge filter.

The fry of Altolamprologus calvus are bottom huggers. For this reason, you will need to pay extra attention to water quality as extra food can quickly foul the substrate. I fed a mixture of Cyclops-eeze, Hikari First Start, and finely ground earthworm and brine shrimp flakes.

I did experience quite a bit of attrition due to several factors:

1. I have no doubt that you would have better results with newly hatched baby brine shrimp.

2. After returning from a business trip, I found almost half of the fry dead due to water quality issues. I partially vacuum the gravel once per week.

3. Some fry grow more quickly and may cannabalize their siblings.

4. The fry are very touchy in regards to water changes. I suggest changing 25% of the water, two to three times per week.

At one month, the tan fry develop some striping. At two months of age, my largest fry is one-half inch long and the body shape is beginning to approximate that of the parents.

Expect to hold the fry for nine months or more to get them to a saleable size of one inch.

Frenchy :D

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Thanks Frenchy

I arrived to find no babies in the main tank.

The few that I put aside when I first removed the log seem to be doing OK.

Going off your article, it might be a good time to remove the pair & give them a tank to themselves.

Cheers

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I have a trio in with Leptos & a couple of loaches. They breed away happily in that.

The other pair I have are in with electric yellows. Again breeding nicely too.

I think it is more a case of what you have with them. Then again I had a 4x2x2 with aceiis, yellows, demasoni & a couple of altos paired up & bred in that too.

Frenchy :D

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