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Kaizen088

Storms and Spawning

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It may just be a co-incidence but after the storms last night I checked my tanks this morning to find a clutch of eggs on the bottom of one of my tanks with a colony of Pepps in it (all my Pepps kick the eggs except for 1 male) . These guys have not bred for a while so I'm thinking the storm (rapid low pressure change ?) was enough to spur them on. I am well aware of the theories about this but wanted to know some results as we haven't had a storm like this for a while. I'd like to know who else had a spawn overnight, what type of fish they were and especially if they hadn't bred for a while.

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Yup lots of fish breeding going on at my house

Details?? I suppose I'd like to know which fish are more affected by the storms...

I got some Marble Longfins a couple months ago which haven't bred yet (everything else has).

The previous owner said they only breed in the wet season (they came from up north).

I tried a 40% water change with fresh rainwater straight from the downpipe (added Prime) last night and added some blackwater extract.

The cold rain water dropped the tank temp from 28.1deg to 26.5 deg. No spawn however.

Edited by Kaizen088
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Details?? I suppose I'd like to know which fish are more affected by the storms...

I got some Marble Longfins a couple months ago which haven't bred yet (everything else has).

The previous owner said they only breed in the wet season (they came from up north).

I tried a 40% water change with fresh rainwater straight from the downpipe (added Prime) last night and added some blackwater extract.

The cold rain water dropped the tank temp from 28.1deg to 26.5 deg. No spawn however.

It's a lot to do with air pressure as much, if not more than temperature change.

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Pretty easy to vary tank pressure artificially if you have a vacume pump. Just lay a continous bead of silicone around the tank top to create a gasket and use a single piece lid with bulkhead fitting. Google if you want to see other peoples results. I suspect using positive pressure would also give good results and this would be much easier as you can use any large aquarium air pump.

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Corys are also easy to spawn by putting in a kilo of ice on a tank that size. Just needs a 3-4 degree drop (or rise).

I know, but I don't breed them intentionally or keep the fry, display only.....and as the question was regarding storms, I answered. Storms do help corys spawn especially in summer.

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Pretty easy to vary tank pressure artificially if you have a vacume pump. Just lay a continous bead of silicone around the tank top to create a gasket and use a single piece lid with bulkhead fitting. Google if you want to see other peoples results. I suspect using positive pressure would also give good results and this would be much easier as you can use any large aquarium air pump.

This was my initial reaction. While it's probably naive to think we can "trick" mother nature, mimicking her is a strong-point of (some) humans. Surely if you wanted to create a change in pressure it would be incredible easy, although I am not sure what effect atmospheric pressure has on the aquarium. Does it perhaps create a sudden change in the partial pressures of certain gases within the tank?

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Your not mimicking nature, you are inducing spawning by producing one of the triggers that stimulate the hormonal process that results in natural spawning.

Say some fish spawn in spring because that's the best for their fry to survive. The fish learn that lengthening of photo period (progressively longer days) is an indication of approaching spring and a minimum period of 6 weeks of ever increasing days will stimulate reproductive hormone production. So putting your tank lights on a timer for 6 weeks will also stimulate spawning even in winter.

What effect does atmospheric pressure have on a tank? It doesn't really matter as it's the pressure change that triggers the spawn sequence/behaviour. This doesn't work for all fish and may be less effective if used a lot but the best way to know is to try as it's relatively easy.

Why do some fish spawn in storms? They probably come from a region that has a pronounced wet season and storms mean lots more available habitat, abundance of food and less predator pressure. Lowering water temp and increasing aeration/current are also good triggers as fresh heavy rain is usually cold and has a higher dissolved oxygen content.

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