Jump to content
Squirtle

How would you filter this?

Recommended Posts

Hello, So another weekend another setup XD

I tried uploading pictures but same issue with size... to try explain... I built a floor stand for a 5x2x3 & a 6x2x2, I also made space for a sump but after some looking I decided I dont want to use a sump. main reason is I would like to keep the tanks viewable from both sides and having a sump means I will be looking at the sump half the time, same applies for bulkheads.

was wondering how you guys would suggest filtering them? one issue is the 5x2x3 has euro bracing thats at least 4 inch wide at minimal so getting a hob / canister into the tank is going to be tricky. Was thinking I could hard plumb that section for a canister? Then I have the issue of some how hiding canisters when the setup is dead bang in the center of the room + running the cables quite a task.

I know in the 6x2x2 I will be setting it up for baby turtles & gippsland water dragons so it wont be full to the top, canisters most likely all I can use here, will it work? how will the siphon start? I have a hard time getting one to start on my low tier racks let alone right on the floor?

5ft I am unsure what will be going in.

Thanks guys.

edit?usp=sharing

edit?usp=sharing

edit?usp=sharing

P.S I am also going to move the 6x2 next to the 5x2 to create a L shape as such.

Edited by Squirtle
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The simplest method is to run power/air from the ceiling. If you don't want a sump then use an internal filter. A powerhead on a sponge will be sufficient although 2 would be safer (or an UGF). Next alternative is an overhead filter - you can build these into a light hood if you want to make it pretty. Third option is to sump via a bottom hole. A few marine tanks use clear pipe as a vertical standpipe and return water up through the middle of this as well. (any water level height you want is fine).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, I cant use a bulkhead out the base as the tank is 45mm off the ground, I tried a few methods but any way is going to result in the bulkhead / male - female thread siliconed, hitting the cement.

Second option would be to drill the back of the tanks but as they are planned to be viewed from front & back this is not very eye appealing.

I have planned for power via a trench in the cement cut out Or from the ceiling then going to test a spare eheim canister out if it works well I will use canisters & build some type of feature around the canisters to blend them in some how...? xD if not good old internals seem to be a comforting idea. I wouldn't an overflow also aqua but the overall total height then would be excessive.

I wish I could post pictures of the tanks as its a very odd type of setup to make clean.

Thanks again guys !

p.s I am considering adding c02 to these tanks to go for a heavy planted system so I may need to hide the bottle some how also ha ha, I love making life harder then it has to be eh?

Edited by Squirtle
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Turtles may make a planted tank difficult depending on the species, some will eat plants, others crush them while resting on them.

Partially filled high tanks also give canisters a real work out, as they have to pump so high.

An on the top style tray filter could be your best bet, combined with some internal powerheads.

The bottom tank sounds well suited to air powered filtration, or even a hamburg filtermatten style internal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Under gravel filters work well if you have substrate but since you intend to have a heavy planted system then you won't need any filtration at all. You will most probably have to add fish waste and plant fertilizers to the tank.

If you do cut concrete trenches, add some extra pvc pipe while your there. Good for hidden power supply, air supply, co2 supply, water delivery or waste water drainage.

Edited by aquaholic99
Link to comment
Share on other sites



×
×
  • Create New...